| Table of Contents  | Home 

 

COURSES


A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y 


ACSM 1110 - Introduction to College Education

This course is designed to assist the student in achieving educational goals. A variety of skills relating to classroom and individual study at the College level are presented. These skills include: note taking, test taking, time management and stress reduction. Skills in the utilization of library facilities, the College library and computers are also introduced. Students enrolling in ACSM 1110 are required to attend New Student Orientation, which is held prior to the start of classes for the fall, spring, and summer semesters. Any student who does NOT satisfactorily complete ACSM 1110 (with a grade of "C" or better) must repeat the course during the next semester of enrollment. The student will be allowed to take other course work only after securing the permission of the Dean, Arts, Sciences, and Health Professions.

Transfer students with a 2.0 GPA with 45 credit hours, or a 3.0 GPA with 30 credit hours are exempt from ACSM 1110.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: For all new students, ACSM 1110 should be the first credit course for matriculation into the College.

ACSM 1310 - Introduction to Baccalaureate Education

This course provides students in baccalaureate programs program-specific information, insights, and tools that maximize their academic success and achieve career goals. ACSM 1310 should be taken concurrently with ACSM 1110 or in the semester immediately following completion of ACSM 1110.
 
Enrollment in ACSM 1110 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3

ACSM 4110-Senior Seminar

ACSM 4110 serves as a capstone course for the Bachelor of Liberal Studies Program.  Students in the seminar (1) reflect upon and evaluate their undergraduate experiences, especially the interrelatedness of the courses they have studies and the major concepts they have assimilated, (2) demonstrate skills they have mastered, and (3) refine their postgraduate plans.  This course should be in the final semester of the program.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites:  All requirements for the BA in Liberal Studies except those taken in last semester of the senior year

ANES 5110 - Senior Capstone Project

In this course the Anesthesia student will plan, organize, synthesize, and execute a state-of-the-art paper on a relevant topic in anesthesia that meets qualifications for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. This course represents the culmination of the principles taught in NURS 5315 and NURS 5340.

Credit Hours: 1
Pre-requisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5310 - Physical Science in Nurse Anesthesia

This course focuses on chemistry and physics related to anesthesia. It includes an overview of inorganic, biochemistry principles, medical mathematics, and physics. The focus is on gas laws, chemical structure of anesthetics, vaporizers, and the science related to monitoring modalities.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5320 - Advanced Assessment for Nurse Anesthesia

This course provides a systematic approach to the skills necessary for primary anesthesia practice with emphasis on preoperative evaluation and intraoperative/postoperative anesthetic plan modification specific to the patient's health and physical status. Assessment skills include history and physical examination across the lifespan with an emphasis on the adult.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5340 - Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia

This course reviews past and current issues pertaining to the nurse anesthesia profession. Included topics for discussion are the history of nurse anesthesia, the professional role of the nurse anesthetist, practice issues facing nurse anesthetists, Medicare reimbursement rules, and changes in healthcare in America.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5352 - Principles of Anesthesia Practice II (OB/Pediatric)

This course focuses on the anesthetic management of the obstetrical and pediatric patient.  The obstetric portion of the course includes anatomic and physiologic changes in the parturient at all stages of pregnancy, labor and delivery with emphasis on the anesthetic implication of these changes.  Other topics include anesthetic and obstetrical complications, obstetric trauma, and the parturient with systemic disease. Additionally this course covers fetal physiology, neonatal and pediatric anatomy and physiology, neonatal resuscitation and neonatal and pediatric diseases and surgery.  Particular attention is given to induction techniques, airway management and anesthetic management for the neonatal and pediatric patient.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5355 - Principles of Anesthesia Practice III (Advanced Concepts I)

This course will provide an introduction to advanced anesthesia concepts. The major focus of this course will include anesthetic management of neurologic diseases, the neurosurgical patient and all aspects of regional anesthesia. Additionally, this course will focus on advanced airway management techniques and pain management. Included in the course will be a regional anesthesia/ultrasound lab to prepare the student for regional anesthesia administration in the clinical setting.


Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5360 - Principles of Anesthesia Practice IV (Cardiothoracic Anesthesia)

This course provides the student with the principles of management of a patient undergoing major vascular, cardiac, and pulmonary surgery. Emphasis is on cardiac and pulmonary pathophysiology, monitoring, and anesthetic management.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5415 - Anesthesia Seminar

This course provides a comprehensive review of anesthetic management principles for the senior student. Emphasis is placed on synthesis of information acquired throughout the program and application to anesthesia care. Review material includes information on chemistry, physics, physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology. Included in review are principles of anesthesia practice for varying patient populations.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5420 - Pharmacology I

This course provides a systematic approach to the study of pharmacology and its relevance to perioperative anesthetic care. In-depth presentation of the processes of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and chemistry of drug therapy provide a basis for comprehensive understanding of drug actions, adverse reactions, interactions, and anesthetic considerations.

Credit Hours: 4
Pre-requisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5421 - Pharmacology II - Pharmacology of Anesthetic Agents

This course is a study of the action, uptake, distribution, and elimination of anesthetic agents. Particular attention will be paid to chemical properties, preparation, dosage, administration, side effects, and therapeutic uses of these drugs. In addition, monitoring of the effects of anesthetic agents during anesthesia will be emphasized. The drugs to be studied include intravenous anesthetics, neuromuscular blocking agents, local anesthetics, and inhalational agents.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program


ANES 5425 - Advanced Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I


This course is an advanced study of the anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of the cell, cellular transport, skeletal muscle contraction, the nervous system, and the renal system. Study of the physiologic processes in these systems will increase the student’s foundational knowledge and enable application of knowledge in the anesthesia clinical setting.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5426 - Advanced Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology II

This course is an advanced study of the anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of the cardiac and respiratory systems. Study of the pathophysiologic processes in these systems will increase the student’s foundational knowledge and enable application of knowledge in the anesthesia clinical setting.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5430 - Principles of Anesthesia Practice I (Introduction to Anesthetic Practice)

This course introduces the student to anesthesia practice. It includes an overview of airway anatomy, anesthetic agents, monitoring modalities, anesthesia care plans, charting, the anesthesia machine, and techniques for administering anesthesia. Emphasis is on safety and the standards of care for anesthesia practice.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5460 - Principles of Anesthesia Practice V (Advanced Concepts II)

This course presents modules on pain management, advanced monitoring modalities, difficult airway management, and the study of principles of neurosurgical and trauma anesthesia. Airway management segment includes fiberoptic intubation techniques, airway anesthesia, rigid indirect devices, supraglottic devices, and surgical airway management. Hands-on workshop is also provided to increase expertise and decision making in the difficult airway patient.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5737 - Anesthesia Skills and Simulation Lab

This course provides the opportunity for students to practice anesthetic techniques in the skills lab. Each student is evaluated for readiness for clinical practice in the operating room. Students observe in the operating room and are oriented to anesthetic equipment. The hands on practice correlates with the concepts covered and include overview of airway anatomy, anesthetic agents, monitoring modalities, anesthesia care plans, charting, the anesthesia machine, and techniques for administering anesthesia. Emphasis is on safety and the standards of care for anesthesia practice.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5741 - Clinical Practicum I

This practicum introduces the student to clinical practice. Students, with preceptor supervision participate in the induction, maintenance, and emergence of anesthesia in the operating room. These concepts include the unique differences in anatomy and physiology of the pediatric and geriatric patient. Special considerations for anesthesia administration for the pediatric and geriatric populations are included. Particular attention is given to induction techniques, airway management, airway equipment, and pharmacology for the pediatric population.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5742 - Clinical Practicum II

This practicum provides a continuation and advancement of clinical skills. Students are expected to develop more clinical expertise for various surgical cases. Emerging clinical skills should include progression of decision-making skills for anesthesia practice. The hands on practice correlates with the concepts covered in ANES 5355 which focus on regional anesthesia pharmacology, equipment, and techniques. Also included are obstetrical anesthesia taught in ANES 5352.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5743 - Clinical Practicum III

The clinical experience in this practicum continues to provide challenge to the anesthesia student. In addition to gaining more clinical experience in a variety of areas, this practicum emphasizes concepts taught in ANES 5360, Principles IV. These concepts include principles of management of a patient undergoing major vascular, cardiac, and pulmonary surgery. Emphasis is on cardiac and pulmonary pathophysiology, monitoring, and anesthetic management.

Credit Hours: 5
Pre-requisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5744 - Clinical Practicum IV

The clinical experience continues with opportunity for clinical experience with the concepts taught in ANES 5365, Principles V. The concepts include the principles, treatment, procedures, and anesthetic management of the neurosurgical and trauma patient. Emphasis is on fluid/blood replacement, treatment of shock, multiple trauma, neurological trauma, penetrating trauma, and burns. Students gain clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. Focus is on advancement of clinical skills in all areas.

Credit Hours: 5
Pre-requisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANES 5745 - Clinical Practicum V

This practicum provides the opportunity for advancement of clinical practice in specialty areas and development of critical thinking and decision making is evaluated. Emphasis is placed on synthesis of information acquired throughout the program and application to anesthesia care. While supervision continues, evolution of independent thinking and autonomy is encouraged. Ability to make independent decisions is heavily evaluated as the student moves closer to program completion.

Credit Hours: 5
Pre-requisite: Admission to the MSNA program

ANTH 1310 - Introduction to Anthropology

This is a course in socio-cultural anthropology. It will discuss and describe such concepts as: 1) important explanatory and interpretive paradigms (cultural materialism, sociobiology, symbolic anthropology, cognitive anthropology,) post-modernism); 2) subsistence, technology and economics (subsistence types, culture and technology variation, exchange systems); 3) social organization (class and castes, marital residence, descent and kinship, enculturation, rites of passage); 4) religion and ideology (mythology, prehistoric religions, a survey of world religions, witchcraft and magic); 5) fieldwork (data collection, data analyses, culture shock).

Credit Hours: 3

ANTH 2310 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology

This course will examine the origin and subsequent development of hominids (extinct and extant members of the genus Homo) with a specific emphasis on the genetic and cultural factors that have affected human evolution.  Important topics will include micro- and macro-evolutionary processes, primate taxonomy, hominid fossil evidence, and human adaptation and variation.

Credit Hours: 3

ANTH 3310 - Religions of the World

The primary objective of this course will be to study, compare, and contrast the great world religions. These will include: Christianity; Islam; Hinduism; Buddhism; Sikhism; Confucianism; Taoism; and Judaism. Lesser know religions will also be studied: Baha'ism; Jainism; Shintoism; Zoroastrianism.

This course is cross listed with RELS 3315.

Credit Hours: 3

ANTH 3315 - Ethnomedicine

This course will focus on the concepts of medicine and healing in a cross-cultural context. Topics covered will include medical pluralism (indigenous healing practices and ideologies vs.: formal or western medical practices), cultural specific illness, and ethnobotany. The future of traditional medicine in an increasingly westernized world will also be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: WRIT 1311

ANTH 3325 - Anthropology of Religion

This course will explore and analyze religion (understood as both a social institution and a cultural ideology) from a distinctively anthropological point of view. Particular emphasis will be placed on both the purely theoretical and ethnographic issues that are intrinsic to a cross-cultural examination of religion. This course cross registers with RELS 3325.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311, RELS 1310 or RELS 2310

ANTH 4310-Anthropology of Gender, Sexuality, and Patriarchy

This course will critically examine the dynamics of power vis-à-vis the disenfranchised and the dispossessed in both general terms and in regard to specific cases globally, specifically in those cases involving abuses of patriarchy.  This examination will necessarily involve discussions of feminism and feminist theory, the cultural construction of gender and sexuality, and the cultural origins of patriarchy.  Also, the traditional or essentialist perspective will be compared and contrasted with the postmodern perspective

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites: ANTH 1310

ART 1310 - Art Appreciation

This introductory course is a study of how art reflects and shapes human experiences. Students are provided with concepts, terms, and a historical context with which to develop, analyze and articulate their personal responses to a variety of visual media, painting, sculpture, architecture and photography. Class sessions include lecture, discussion, and reflective writing. Works of art are experienced through exhibits, slides, films, and field trips. One research paper is required.

Credit Hours: 3

ART 3310 - Literature and the Visual Arts

This course examines the relationships of the literary and visual arts. Comparative study focuses upon various practices, critical theories, and social, historical, and philosophical concepts that cross-artistic boundaries and influence specific works of literature and/or visual arts. Class sessions include lecture, discussion, film, and slide presentations as well as group activities. Critical thinking is encouraged as students apply concepts to analysis of fiction, poetry, paintings and sculpture from Western and Non-Western cultures. One analytical research paper and several short class presentations are required. This course is team taught by English and art faculty. Credit may be earned for either ENGL 3310 or ART 3310, but not for both.

Completion of ART 1310 and ENGL 2310 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311,

BIOL 1110 - Introduction to Medical Terminology

This course will introduce pre-clinical students in the various allied health sciences to both basic medical and clinical terminology. Vocabulary relevant to basic human anatomy and physiology, medicine and health, disease and clinical analyses will be emphasized. Jargon applicable to clinical specialties such as nursing, surgical technology, radiologic technology, physical therapy, medical technology and emergency health science will be emphasized. Instruction will utilize a team approach; some instruction methods will involve the use of specific computer programs.

Credit Hours: 1

BIOL 1310 - Introduction to Biology

This one semester course presents, describes, discusses, and theorizes about the fundamentals of biology. The topics include: basic biochemistry; cell structure and function; tissue structure and function; genetics and nucleic acids; meiosis; protein synthesis; enzymes; biological membranes; osmosis; active transport; facilitated transport; etc. This course is required for all students lacking previous coursework in biology. Course must be successfully completed before students may enroll in BIOL 2310 (A&P-I) or BIOL 1315 General Biology-I).

Note: This course is required for new students who have not had high school or College biology coursework within the last five years.

Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 1315 - General Biology I

This course is an introduction to biologic principles. Students will student basic and important concepts in biology. These include: biochemistry, cell biology, metabolism, photosynthesis, cell division (mitosis). Other topics will include meiosis, genetics, molecular biology, developmental biology, evolution and ecology.

Credit Hours: 3

BIOL 1315L – General Biology I Laboratory

Students will study and visualize basic principles using a variety of techniques including light (bright field) microscopy, preparation of wet mounts, charts, models, and computer programs. Laboratory exercises will include: introduction to the compound microscope, preparation of biological slides (whole wet mounts), cytology, cell biology, cell physiology, organelles and tissues using electron micrographs and computer programs, mitosis, meiosis and early embryology. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the use of the scientific method to make inquiries about the natural world. Students will be required to produce and maintain laboratory reports, produce drawings and illustrations and maintain laboratory notebook. (Meets 3 hours per week)

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: BIOL 1315

BIOL 1316 - General Biology II

This course relates the broad biological principles covered in BIOL 111 to specific groups of animals. Emphasis is placed on the structure (morphology) and physiology of diverse organisms.

Enrollment in BIOL 1316L is strongly recommended

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 1315

BIOL 1316L – General Biology II Laboratory

Students will study a diverse sampling of animals using taxonomic, microscopic and dissection techniques. Emphasis is placed on the divergent structure and physiology of these organisms. Organisms to be studied include those of the following phyla: Sarcomastigophora, Porifera, Cnidaria, Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Annelida, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata and Chordata. Appropriate computer programs will be used to assist learning. Students will also be introduced to the anatomy (osteology) of the human skeleton. Students will be required to generate and maintain laboratory notebooks comprised of laboratory reports, figures and illustrations. (Meets 3 hours per week)

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: BIOL 1315, 1315L
Corequisite: 1316

BIOL 2310 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This foundation course in the life sciences introduces students to important concepts and biological principles necessary to understanding the structure and function of the human body. These concepts include: basic biology, basic chemistry, basic biochemistry, fundamental cellular biology (cytology and cytostructure) and cellular physiology. Other topics include: basic tissue structure and function, mitosis and meiosis. All fundamental information will be directly related to the concept of systemic homeostasis. Following this introduction, a survey of systemic anatomy and physiology will be initiated. This includes: 1) the structure and function of the integument; 2) the structure and function of teeth, bones and joints; 3) and the structure and function of muscles (skeletal, cardiac and smooth).

Enrollment in BIOL 2310L is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisites: CHEM 1310 or 1315

BIOL 2310L - Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

Students enrolled in this course will examine the anatomy and morphology of human cells, tissues, organs and systems. Students will study the following: 1) the fine structure of human cells; 2) the light microscopic anatomy and electron microscopic structure of human tissues; 3) the microscopic structure of the integumentary system; 4) the gross anatomy and microscopic morphology of the human skeleton and osseous tissue; 5) the gross anatomy, histology and electron microscopic fine structure of the human skeletal muscular system and muscle tissue; 6) the histology of the nervous system, especially neurons and synapses. Students will utilize a wide variety of methodologies to complete the above units, including: videos, models, human bones, human skulls, microscopic slides of human cells and tissues; electron micrographs of human cells and tissues, and multiple CD-ROM computer programs. The laboratory is a self-paced, computerized laboratory.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: BIOL 2310

BIOL 2311 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This is the continuation of BIOLOGY 2310 Human Anatomy and Physiology-I. The course integrates the structure and function of the various components of the following organ systems: 1) the structure and function of the nervous system; 2) the structure and function of the endocrine system; 3) digestive system or gastrointestinal-tract including the accessory glands (salivary glands, liver, gall bladder and exocrine pancreas); 4) the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems including the heart, blood vessels and blood 5)the respiratory system; 6) the urinary system; 7) the male reproductive system; 8) and the female reproductive system. Human developmental biology will be discussed in association with human reproduction and embryogenesis.

Enrollment in BIOL 2311L is strongly recommended

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in BIOL 2310.

BIOL 2311L - Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

Students enrolled in this course will examine the anatomy and morphology of human cells, tissues, organs and systems. Students will study the following: 1) the gross and microscopic anatomy of the human brain and spinal cord; 2) the gross anatomy of the peripheral nervous system; 3) the light microscopic and fine structure of human endocrine glands; 4) the gross and light microscopic anatomy of the human digestive system; 5) the gross, light and electron microscopic anatomy of the human heart; 6) the structure and distribution of blood vessels, including capillaries; 7) the light microscopic structure of human blood cells; 8) the structure of the lymphoid system and its cells; 9) the gross anatomy, light microscopic and electron microscopic morphology of the human respiratory system; 9) the gross anatomy, histology and electron microscopic fine structure of the human urinary system; 10) the gross anatomy and histology of the male and female reproductive systems. Students will utilize a wide variety of methodologies to complete the above units, including: videos, models, microscopic slides of human organs, electron micrographs of human organs and multiple CD-ROM computer programs. The laboratory is a self-paced, computerized laboratory.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL 2310 and BIOL 2310L with a grade of C or better
Corequisite: BIOL 2311

BIOL 2320 - Fundamentals of Human Nutrition

This course deals with the chemistry of the basic nutrients, i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and water, and their role in the conservation of health. Metabolic pathways utilized for the assimilation of these nutrients are studied. Maintenance of good nutrition habits are discussed. Relationships between poor nutrition and diseases (cancer, heart disease, diabetes, etc.) are described. Information is presented to reinforce the idea that diet/nutrition is the most important health factor that individuals can control. Learning what comprises a healthy diet, and the selection of such a diet is essential to good health. So-called "new" nutrients and nutritional research developments are discussed. Natural medicines and alternative medicines are also described.

Enrollment in BIOL 2311 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 2310

BIOL 2325 - Fundamentals of Microbiology

Fundamentals of Microbiology is an introductory course in which the basic concepts of microbiology are presented. The course covers the impact of microorganisms in a historical context, microbial functional anatomy, metabolic activities, growth, control of growth, and genetic mechanisms among bacteria. Also covered are the multiplication strategies and biological roles of viruses and selected procarytic and eucaryotic microorganisms. The role of microorganisms in the environment and public health will be discussed. The course also includes an overview of infectious disease principles.

Enrollment in BIOL 2325L is strongly recommended

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:
BIOL 1315 or BIOL 2310

BIOL 2325L – Fundamentals of Microbiology Laboratory

This general laboratory course focuses on the basic principles and procedures used to manipulate and study microorganisms. The course will begin with basic microscopic skills: preparations and staining of specimens, proper use and handling of compound light microscopes, interpretation of visual images. Following the microscopy unit students will learn basic aseptic technique, isolation, cultivation, enumeration and pure culturing skills. After students have developed these basic skills they will expand on these methods to experimentally determine whether bacteria produce various enzymes and hemolysins and to cultivate bacterial viruses. Students will determine the sensitivity of selected bacteria to various methods of microbial control: ultraviolet radiation, heavy metals, antibiotics and disinfectants. A genetics unit will demonstrate the concepts of induced mutations and transformation using antibiotic resistance as a marker. An immunology unit will demonstrate serological methods.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisites: BIOL 2325

BIOL 2335 - Medical/Surgical Observation

This course is directed toward undergraduate, pre-health care students in an effort to introduce them to clinical medicine, its related fields and required training and preparation. Clinical medicine will be integrated with basic biomedical science and research. Each student will complete eight required surgical observation procedures and autopsies at local hospitals. Multiple elective observations are also required. During this course students actually work side-by-side with physicians and surgeons in the operating room. This course has a limited enrollment. Due to limited space, this course cannot be audited. (Course can be taken two times for a total of 6 Credit Hours)

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 2325L

BIOL 3305 - Introduction to Biological Research

Designed to give the beginning biology major an introduction to literature resources, topic selection, use of statistics, scientific logic, and the oral and written presentation of results.

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 1316, 1316L

BIOL 3310 - General Botany

A study of the biology of the fungi, the fungus-like protists, the algae (cyanobacteria and protistans), the bryophytes, the cryptogams and the phanerogams. Among the phanerogams an emphasis will be placed on the gymnosperms. Topics dealing with the general biology and categorization of the angiosperms will also be presented.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 1316, 1316L

BIOL 3315 - The History of Biology and Medicine

This course will study the history of biology and medicine through the following eras: 1) prehistory, 2) ancient China, 3) ancient India, 4) ancient Egypt, 5) ancient Mesopotamia, 6) ancient Greece, 7) Alexandria, 8) ancient Rome, 9) the middle ages, 10) the Renaissance, 11) the New World, 12) the period of Enlightenment and Victorian times, 13) and finally modern biological and medical themes. Selected and significant historical topics in the development of such fields as biochemistry, microbiology, botany, zoology medicine, physiology, anatomy, genetics, embryology, ecology, dentistry, medicine, pharmacology, and surgery will be discussed. Concepts of futuristic biology and medicine will also be developed. The impact of both the biological and medical sciences on society and technology will be described throughout the course.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 1316,1316L or BIOL 2311, 2311L

BIOL 3320 - Fundamentals of Immunology

Fundamentals of immunology is an introductory course in which both basic and advanced concepts of immunology are presented. The basic concepts presented include, but are not limited to: function of the innate defense mechanisms, antigens, development of the immune system, lymphocytes, immunoglobulins, lymphokines and inflammation. Advanced concepts that will be presented are: Band T-lymphocyte ontogeny, generation of antibody diversity and genetics of the major histocompatibility complex, cytokine networks and immunogenetics. Following the successful completion of the course, the student should have a firm understanding of the organization, function and operation of the immune system in the defense against viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, tumors and transplanted courses.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 2325, 2325L

BIOL 3325 - General Genetics

This course is a study of fundamental hereditary mechanisms and relationships. Emphasis is placed on nucleic acids and the molecular and cytological roles by which genes are distributed and expressed. The course will cover six major units: I. The continuity of life cell division, and genetics. II. Heredity, genes and DNA. III. Expression of genetic information. IV. Recombinant DNA. V. Detection of nucleic acids and proteins. VI. Gene function in eukaryotic cells.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: 8 BIOL Credits, CHEM 1316, 1316L

BIOL 3330 - Introduction to Kinesiology

This course is designed to provide the student with a general overview of the principles involved in human motion. Emphasis will be placed on basic principles of kinesiology including: 1) a review of the major body systems that are involved in generating movement; 2) an overview of basic biomechanics; 3) an in-depth look at the anatomy (including origin and insertion of muscular attachments) of the major structures and joints of the human body such as: a) shoulder, b) elbow, c) wrist, d) hand, e) temporomandibular joint (TMJ), f) neck and trunk; g) pelvic girdle, h) hip, i) knee, j) ankle joint and foot. The course will also involve an in depth look at the actions that occur at these joints.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of BIOL 2310 with a grade of C or better

BIOL 3340 - General Histology

This course will thoroughly investigate and analyze the structure of the cells and tissues that comprise the human body. The two major subdivisions of this course are: The structure of cells (cell biology): This part of the course will study the fine structure (ultrastructure) of cells. Various techniques and procedures for the study of cellular fine structure will be discussed. These include: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron microscopic enzyme histochemistry, immunoelectronmicroscopy, X-ray spectroscopic analysis. II. The second part of the course will examine the structure (light microscopy and electron microscopy) of the four basic tissue types (epithelial tissue, the connective tissue, muscle tissue and nerve tissue). Techniques for studying tissues will also be discussed. Structural-functional relationships will be discussed throughout. Relevant histopathology will also be incorporated into the course. Students will be required to complete multiple laboratory assignments using assigned computer programs, electron micrographs and a complete histology microfiche set.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: 12 BIOL credits and 8 CHEM credits

BIOL 3345 - Microscopic Anatomy

This course is offered during the spring semester. This course will thoroughly investigate and analyze the light and electron microscopic structure of the cells and tissues that comprise the organs of the human body. All lectures will discuss the light microscopic histology, the ultrastructure and the molecular structure of human cells and tissues. Functional and structural specializations will be described and discussed in detail. Changes in cell structure related to disease process, i.e., cellular pathology of histopathology, will also be described. Organs and systems to be covered include the following: the cardiovascular system: the heart, arteries, veins and capillaries; the brain and spinal cord: myelinated and non-myelinated nerves; the endocrine system: the adenohypophysis, the neurohypophysis, the pineal gland, the thyroid and parathyroid glands, the islets of Langerhans; the adrenal medulla and the adrenal cortex; the digestive system: stomach, small intestine, large intestine; salivary glands, liver, gall bladder; the respiratory system: bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, respiratory membrane; the urinary system: kidneys, glomeruli and nephrons; and the male and female reproductive systems: ovaries, testes, various ducts, etc. Like BIOL 3340, this course also has a laboratory component.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: BIOL 2311, 2311L; CHEM 1316, 1316L

BIOL 3350 - Cellular, Molecular and Developmental Biology

This course will present information related to cytology, cellular physiology, molecular biology, developmental biology. The primary concepts to be presented will include the following. I. An overview of cells and cell research. II. Cell-to-cell signaling and communication during development. III. Cell structure and function. IV. Cell regulation. Specific topics to be covered are: 1) the ER, Golgi complex and lysosomes and their role in protein sorting and transport;
2) mitochondria, peroxisomes, glyoxysomes and chloroplasts in bioenergetics and metabolism; 3) the cytoskeleton and its role in cell movement and form; 4) the plasmalemma and the cell surface; 5) cell signaling; 6) the cell cycle; 7) and cancer. Research in cell biology and contemporary techniques for studying cells will be emphasized throughout the course.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: 12 semester credit hours in BIOL

BIOL 3355 - General Parasitology

In this course, students will understand learn about the major parasites of humans and domesticated animals (cattle, sheep, dogs, horses, etc.). This experience will include: 1) epidemiology, 2) evolution, morphology, and natural history. The amazingly complex, yet successful life cycles of these animals will be related in detail. This course has a laboratory component.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: 12 BIOL Credits; CHEM 1316, 1316L

BIOL 3360 - Principles of Ecology

This course describes the fundamental ecological principles governing the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Ecology is a holistic (broad-based and integrative) approach to understanding living things as they relate to both their physical environment and to each other. It is the interactions of living things that provide the data for ecological studies.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites Courses: 12 BIOL credits

BIOL 3370 – Embryology and Developmental Biology

This course is a vertebrate embryology course. It is a study of human embryology. Emphasis is on the fundamental developmental; processes shared by vertebrates. Topics include: 1) meiosis and gametogenesis; 2) fertilization; 3) early development of the embryo form the zygote state through the differentiation and development of the neural tube and the neural crests (period of the embryo); 4) the events and phases of embryogenesis from fertilization to nine months (10 lunar months) of development; period of the ovum; period of the embryo; period of the fetus. The next phase of the course will detail the development of selective human organ systems including the nervous system, the sensory organs, and the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and urogenital systems. Throughtout the course the common mechanisms involved in cytodifferentiation, histodifferentiation, organodifferentiation, and systemic differentiation will be discussed. Events related to gene activation/inactivation and biochemical differentiation, especially as related to cell-to-cell communication, will be discussed. Developmental (congenital) defects will be described. Especially those related to the neural crests and neural tube (neural crest and neural tube defects). The causes and successful clinical treatments (s) of pregnant mothers against these serious birth defect will be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: 12 credit hours of BIOL; CHEM 1316, 1316L

BIOL 3370L - Embryology and Developmental Biology Laboratory

This course is a vertebrate embryology laboratory course. The light microscopy of the following will be studied, demonstrated, and discussed; 1) structure of the male and female reproductive tissues; 2) light microscopy spermatogenesis and oogenesus; 3) light microscopy and comparison of mitosis and meiosis; 4) fertilization; 5) light microscopy of cleavage, blastulation, gastrulation, and neuralation; 6) light microscopy of early embryogenesis of the frog to 4 mm; 7) chick fetal development: 18 hours, 24 hours, 33 hours, and 48 hours; 8) fetal pig development to 10 mm. Appropriate internet web sites and CD-ROM programs will also be utilized.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: BIOL 3370 

BIOL 3375 - Pathogenic Microbiology

Pathogenic microbiology will emphasize the pivotal balance between microbial mechanisms of virulence and host defenses. The course will begin with an overview of the disease process and the types of pathogens. Next, a unit on innate and acquired host defenses will be presented. Mechanisms used by pathogens to overcome or inactivate host defenses will emphasized throughout the course. The remaining portion of the course will be comprised of units covering selected bacterial, viral, protozoan, fungal and pathogens. The course will conclude with a study on the evolution and emergence of infectious diseases. Students will research and complete a project. (No Laboratory)

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 2325, 2325L

BIOL 3380 - Computerized Dissectible Human Gross Anatomy

This is a three-dimensional, computerized study and evaluation of human gross anatomy.  Advanced graphics, three dimensional analyses, and state-of-the-art computer programs will be utilized. 

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 2311 and 2311L

BIOL 4310 – Pathophysiology

This course is a study of structural and physiological alterations associated with multiple disease processes and cell death. Topics for discussion will include: 1) inflammation; 2) water and electrolyte imbalance; 3) hemodynamic disorders; 4) trauma; 5) shock; 6) neoplasia (carcinogenesis); 7) cell death and necrosis; 8) and apoptosis.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 3350

BIOL 4325 - Endocrinology

This course will present the various types of hormones (polypeptide, protein, steroid, fatty acid, cytokines, etc.) and their mechanism(s) of action on specific target cells. The individual endocrine glands will then be surveyed with regard to their structure and function. The role of hormones as in cell-to-cell communication and the regulation of systemic metabolism and homeostasis will be studied in detail. Information regarding the specific endocrine glands and their specific secretory (hormonal) products, their function, biochemistry and physiology will be presented. Both the traditional and the so-called "new" endocrine glands (skin, kidneys, heart, etc.) will be evaluated. Clinical relationships between endocrine hyposecretion and hypersecretion, as related to a broad spectrum of endocrine and homeostatic disorders, will be presented in detail. Multiple laboratory assignments will be required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of BIOL 2311 with a grade of C or better

BIOL 4330 - Oncology and Tumor Cell Biology

This course will endeavor to instruct students on the development and causes of cancer. Students will study the basic cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology of cancer cells and tumors. Current ideas with regard to cancer prevention and treatment will also be discussed. The latter will include the role of nutrition in the treatment and prevention of carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis. Assigned biomedical journal readings will be utilized throughout the course as supportive information for all lectures and text assignments. Some INTERNET sites will also be utilized. Some laboratory assignments will also be required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 3325, 3350

BIOL 4335 - Human Cardiovascular Anatomy and Physiology

Biology 4335 will thoroughly investigate and discuss the normal structure, function and biochemistry/pharmacology, as well as the pathophysiology of the heart, blood vessels, capillaries, blood and lymphoid system. The following topics will be emphasized: 1) the special properties of cardiac muscle; 2) the events of the cardiac cycle; 3) the regulation of the heart rate and cardiac rhythm; 5) the ECG/EKG; 6) the physiology of elastic and muscular arteries; 7) the regulation of blood pressure; 8) capillary transport; 9) the structure and function of the blood cells; 10) red blood cells and gas transport; 11) the function of the white blood cells, including the B and T-lymphocytes; 12) extrinsic and intrinsic blood clotting; 13) and the fetal circulation. The pharmacodynamics of the cardiovascular system will also be discussed. Clinically, topics such as cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, LDLs, HDLs and atherosclerosis, and heart transplants will be evaluated. Computer laboratory assignments will be used to visually enhance didactic concepts. This course has a laboratory component.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of BIOL 2311 with a grade of C or better

BIOL 4340 - Human Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

BIOL 4340 will present and discuss the normal structure and function of neurons, the functional units of the nervous system. This will include details on resting membrane potentials, action potentials and other aspects of bioelectricity. The structure and neurochemistry of synapses will also be described including information relevant to "new" neurotransmitters. The structure and function of the brain and spinal cord will also be discussed in detail including specific nerve nuclei and tracts (ascending and descending). Some topics for conversation and discussion will include: 1) the structure and function of nerve cells and synapses; 2) bioelectricity, action potentials and nerve impulses; 3) the CSF and the physiology of intracranial pressure; 4) the structure and function of the cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem, including specific nerve nuclei; 5) the cranial nerves; 6) the spinal cord, ascending and descending pathways; 7) the biochemistry of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides; 8) growth and repair in the nervous system. When ever possible fundamental information and related clinical correlations will be presented and discussed.

Note: This course does have a laboratory component.

Completion of BIOL 3350 is recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of BIOL 2311 with a grade of C or better

BIOL 4345 - The Structure and Function of the Urinary System

This is an advanced anatomy and physiology course designed primarily for pre-med (human medicine) majors. The course will describe primarily the role of the kidneys in the regulation of: osmotic balance, electrolyte balance and pH balance as required for the maintenance of in cellular and total body homeostasis. The physiology of nephrons, the functional units of the kidney, in glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption and tubular secretion will be detailed. The countercurrent mechanisms involved in these activities will be described. In addition, contemporary ideas with regard to the role of the kidneys in other biological and physiological activities will be discussed. These include: 1) the role of the kidney in blood pressure regulation; 2) the role of the kidney in Ca� homeostasis; 3) the role of the kidney in erythropoiesis, 4) and others. The course will close with a discussion of renal pathophysiology. The course does have a laboratory component. This will involve studies on: 1) the gross anatomy of the kidneys; 2) the histology of the kidneys; and 3) the electron microscopy of a nephron

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of BIOL 2311 with a grade of C or better

BIOL 4350 - The Structure and Function of the Respiratory System

This is an advanced anatomy and physiology course designed primarily for pre-med (human medicine) majors. The course will describe primarily the anatomy and physiology of respiration of the respiratory system. The course will emphasize: 1) the mechanics of respiration (inspiration and expiration); 2) the physiology of pulmonary gas exchange (external respiration) and blood tissue gas exchange (internal respiration); 3) the transport of the respiratory gasses through the cardiovascular system. The role of the respiratory system in acid base balance will be described. Neural mechanisms regulating respiration will also be discussed. The pathophysiology of the respiratory system, involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders (COPDs), will be studied.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of BIOL 2311 with a grade of C or better

BIOL 4355 - Paleo-Evolution

This course will focus on: 1) the basic principles and mechanisms of biological evolution; 2) human evolution as conceptualized within the context of paleoanthropology. Important topics are: 1) the historical development of evolutionary theory; 2) population genetics; 3) phenotypic variation; 4) speciation; 5) and macroevolution. These theoretical notions, and others, will be discussed in the context of a thorough analysis of human evolution with a special emphasis on paleoanthropology.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 3325

BIOL 4365 - General Pharmacology

Course describes and discusses pharmacology and medicine. Topics for discussion will be: 1) principles of pharmacology; 2) pharmacokinetics; 3) pharmacodynamics; 4) autonomic pharmacology; 5) cardiovascular pharmacology; 6) autacoids; 7) chemotherapy; 8) endocrine pharmacology; 9) CNS pharmacology; 10) hemo/immunopharmacology. Clinical case scenarios will be presented.

Completion of BIOL 3350 is strongly recommended

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of BIOL 2311 with a grade of C or better

BIOL 4415 - Pathogenic Microbiology and Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory

The structure of disease causing bacteria is investigated. Mechanisms of disease are presented. The response of organisms to these disease causing bacteria are studied. Infection, inflammation, immune responses, etc., are investigated.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: BIOL 2325, 2325L; CHEM 1316, 1316L

BIOL 4910 - Human Medicine/Biology Seminar

This course is a series of one-hour seminars presented by both students and faculty. All presentations and reviews will involve the presentation and discussion of significant new research and clinical information related to human medicine. Students will select topics from either the medical literature or the Internet. Students will then prepare an annotated and illustrated report for presentation and discussion at class meetings. Audio-visual techniques must be utilized during all student lectures. Each student will make multiple presentations during the semester. Grades will be based on the thoroughness and understanding of the subject matter as demonstrated by both the written reports and the class presentations by each individual student. In class participation will also be evaluated. The format for this course is not unlike that of a journal club. During the first weeks of the course, involved faculty will present demonstrative seminars to students.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of 90 credit hours

BIOL 4915 - Research Problems in Biology/Medicine

Faculty guided research for biology and human medicine majors.
 
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credit hours

CHEM 1310 - Introduction to Chemistry

This is a fundamentals of chemistry course. This course is subdivided into inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisite: Enrollment in or credit for MATH 1315

CHEM 1315 - Fundamentals of Chemistry I

Fundamentals of Chemistry I introduces the student to the basic principles of the science of chemistry. The course begins with a discussion of the importance of units of measurement, and the interconversions between units and the reliability of data. These themes are reiterated throughout the course. Major areas of emphasis in this course are: 1) the organization of matter; 2) the stoichiometry of chemical change; 3) gas behavior; 4) energy transformations that accompany chemical change; 5) and electron configurations and periodicity.

Enrollment in CHEM 1315L strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisite: MATH 1315

CHEM 1315L - Fundamentals of Chemistry I Laboratory

Laboratory for Fundamentals of Chemistry I is a hands-on laboratory course designed to interface with, and complement, the topic covered in Chemistry 1315. Students learn the basics of measurements, scientific method, chemical analysis, and recording data. (Lab meets three hours per week.).

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: CHEM 1315

CHEM 1316 - Fundamentals of Chemistry II

CHEM 1316 builds on and expands the basic chemical principles learned in CHEM 1315. This course begins with a discussion of the theories of chemical bonding and molecular shapes. This is followed by a brief overview of the bonding properties of carbon and the structural aspects of organic compounds. Most of the course is devoted to chemical reactions, with emphasis on quantitative and conceptual features of reaction dynamics. Units include chemical kinetics, equilibrium, transition state theory and chemical thermodynamics. Application of these concepts will include units covering equilibria of acid-base systems and ionic systems (buffers, solubility, and complexions). The purpose of CHEM 1316 is to provide students with a strong foundation in understanding chemical reactions as dynamic processes. These processes have wide applications in most natural phenomena.

Enrollment in CHEM 1316L is strongly recommended

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1315; CHEM 1315

CHEM 1316L - Fundamentals of Chemistry II Laboratory

Laboratory for Fundamentals of Chemistry II is a hand-on laboratory designed to provide experimental inquiry into the topics covered in Chemistry 1316. Students expand their knowledge of chemical analysis and learn some basic techniques of synthesis. Topics covered include: 1) chemical kinetics; 2) equilibria; 3) and thermodynamics. (Lab meets three hours per week.)

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: CHEM 1315, CHEM 1315L
Corequisite: CHEM 1316

CHEM 2210 - Analytical Chemistry

This course deals with equilibria, titrations, electrochemistry, chromatography and a variety of spectroscopic techniques. The latter include nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), UV/vs and mass spectrometry (MS). The steps in chemical analyses, unit conversions, determination of chemical concentrations and the preparation of solutions are described in relation to analytical chemistry. The course encompasses methods for calibrating analytical equipment and a description of the statistical methods that can be used to evaluate experimental error.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: CHEM 1316, CHEM 1316L
Corequisite: CHEM 2210L

CHEM 2210L - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

This course is an analytical chemistry laboratory that deals with experiments involving titrations, electrochemistry, chromatography and a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Chemical measurements involve unit conversions, solution preparations and the use of basic analytical chemistry equipment. Statistical analysis and error determinations are applied to the various analytical experiments performed during the course. (Lab meets three hours per week).

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: CHEM  1316, CHEM 1316L
Corequisites: CHEM 2210

CHEM 2310 - General Organic Chemistry I

A study of the compounds of carbon and includes the study of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Course will include discussions on the biological aspects of organic chemistry.

Enrollment in CHEM 2310L is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: CHEM 1316, CHEM 1316L

CHEM 2310L - General Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

This course will introduce chemistry students to basic laboratory operations and procedures. Techniques of organic chemistry will be described, including an introduction to spectroscopy. Computer analyses will be utilized. (Lab meets three hours per week).

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: CHEM 2310

CHEM 2311 - General Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHEM 2310. Course will discuss carbon compounds containing carbonyl, carboxylic acid, amine, and pheno-functional groups. Relationships with biological chemistry will be described.

Enrollment in CHEM 2311L is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: CHEM 2310

CHEM 2311L - General Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

This course is a continuation of CHEM 2310. This course will acquaint chemistry students with important laboratory operations. The course will stress reactions and synthesis. Computer analyses will be utilized. (Lab meets three hours per week).

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: CHEM 2310, CHEM 2310L
Corequisite: CHEM 2311

CHEM 3310 - Biochemistry

This course will be comprised of approximately 15-20 units. Students will study: 1) the basic biochemical molecules, their structure and functions. These will include: proteins, enzymes, lipids, carbohydrates (including glycogen metabolism and gluconeogenesis) and nucleic acids (including replication, transcription and protein synthesis). 2) Studies on intermediary metabolism will include: glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, the citric acid cycle (Krebs or TCA cycle), oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism. 3) Students will also study signal transduction pathways and mechanisms involved in the action of hormones and neurotransmitters.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOL 1316 or BIOL 2311, CHEM 2311

CHEM 4410 - Toxicology

This course is a combination lecture and laboratory course. The course content includes a comprehensive overview of toxins involved in forensic studies.

This course is cross listed with FOSC 4410

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: CHEM 3310

CHEM 4915 - Research Problems in Chemistry

Faculty guided research in Chemistry for biology and human medicine majors. This course may be take more than once. Faculty approval is required.

Credit hours: 1-6
Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least 8 semester credit hours in CHEM


CLSC 1110 - Introduction to Medical Laboratory Sciences

This introductory course covers the admission/curriculum requirements for entrance into the CLS program. General topics such as universal precaution/safety, professional behaviors, communication skills, and confidentiality are discussed. Career guidance and career development are addressed. The design of the laboratory and the function of the CLS professional are described in detail.

Credit Hours: 1

CLSC 1310 - Introduction to Laboratory Methods

In this course students will learn the theory and practical applications of basic laboratory math. Basic clinical laboratory techniques such as phlebotomy, pipeting, blood smear preparation, physical and chemical urine examination, and other simple hematological and microbiological techniques are studied and practiced. Principles and procedures for laboratory equipment such as balances, centrifuges, microscopes, and the spectrometer are also covered/practiced.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: CHEM 1315; MATH 1315

CLSC 3710 - Urinalysis and Body Fluids

This course begins with discussions of renal anatomy, related principles of urine formation and the history of urinalysis. Discussions then focus on the principles and practice of microscope, physical and chemical analysis of urine. Body fluids lectures cover human anatomy as it relates to the formation of various fluids including synovial fluid, serous fluid, spinal fluid, semen, amniotic fluid, and feces. Microscopic and biochemical analysis of each fluid and important disease processes are also discussed.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: CLSC 3710L

CLSC 3710L - Urinalysis and Body Fluid Laboratory

This laboratory course will include the practice of basic techniques used in the physical, chemical, and microscopic analysis of urines and body fluid specimens.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: CLSC 3710

CLSC 3715 - Mycology, Parasitology, and Virology

This course focuses on the diagnosis of infections caused by fungi, parasite, and viruses. The course also includes discussions of classification schemes, life cycles, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment options.

Credit Hours: 1

CLSC 3720 - Clinical Immunology and Serology

This course includes discussions of innate, humoral, and cell-mediated immune mechanisms. Topics include, but are not limited to, innate resistance, complement, lymphocyte ontogeny, generation of immunoglobulin and TCR diversity, MHC, cytokines, immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune diseases and serology.

Credit Hours: 3

CLSC 3725 - Immunohematology

This course considers immunohematology, blood banking and immunopathology. Immunohematology is focused on discussions of blood group antigens and antibodies, and their detection, as well as tests for serologic compatibility. Blood banking considers blood donors, processing of donated units, blood components and the therapeutic consequences of transfusion. Immunopathology considers hemolytic disease of the newborn and autoimmune hemolytic anemias, including mechanism and diagnosis.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisite: CLSC 3725L

CLSC 3725L - Immunohematology Laboratory

This laboratory course offers the student an opportunity to practice the performance of procedures such as serologic tests, blood typing studies, antibody screens/identifications, and cross matches.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: CLSC 3725

CLSC 3730 - Clinical Biochemistry I

This course will discuss pathology, and analysis of proteins, enzymes, lipids, and carbohydrates. The pathology of both the hepatic and cardiac organ systems will be disussed. Additionally, the evaluation of quality control and other specialized topics will be included.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisite: CLSC 3730L

CLSC 3730L - Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory will include the discussion, demonstration, and practice of both manual and semi-automated methods of analysis. Analysis will include the use of the spectrophotometer, performance of electrophoresis, and the operation of automated chemistry instrumentation. Laboratory practice of quality control analysis will also be included.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: CLSC 3730

CLSC 3740 - Clinical Hematology I

This course will explore basic concepts of hematopoeisis in conjunction with erythrocyte and leukocyte structure/morphology, physiology, and function. The lecture will provide an introduction to the topics of platelets and hemostasis and will discuss the processes of primary and secondary hemostasis as well as the process of fibrinolysis. Anemia and various hemoglobin disorders will be discussed. The course will also provide instruction about nonmalignant diseases of white blood cells.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisite: CLSC 3740L

CLSC 3740L - Clinical Hematology Laboratory

This laboratory course will include the discussion, demonstration, and practice of routine and specialized hematological analyses including white blood cell differentials, hand cell counts, microhematocrit and hemoglobin determination, and other selected hematological and coagulation tests.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: CLSC 3740

CLSC 3750 - Clinical Bacteriology I

This course focuses on the isolation and identification of aerobic bacteria, including the Gram-positive cocci/bacilli, and Gram-negative cocci/bacilli. Some miscellaneous groups of bacteria will also be discussed. The course also includes discussions of classification schemes, epidemiology, and pathogenesis.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisite: CLSC 3750L

CLSC 3750L - Clinical Bacteriology Laboratory

This laboratory course provides the opportunity for students to practice the isolation and identification of the pathogenic bacteria described in Bacteriology I. Pure culture isolates of representative organisms from each group of bacteria will be morphologically and biochemically examined.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: CLSC 3750

CLSC 4730 - Clinical Biochemistry II

 This course will discuss the physiology, pathology, and analysis of nonprotein nitrogens, acid base balance, electrolytes, and osmolality. The pathology of the renal system as it relates to these analytic topics will be explored. This course will also discuss the physiology, pathology, and analysis of the endocrine system and its hormones. Additionally, instruction in the biochemistry and analysis of specialized/ advanced topics will be included.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: CLSC 3730

CLSC 4740 - Hematology II

This course will discuss the pathophysiology and diagnosis of leukemias, lymphomas and related malignant WBC disorders. Principles and applications of flow cytometry will be described. The evaluation of bone marrow and the use of cytochemical stains will also be discussed. Disorders of primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis, thrombophilias, and related disorders will also be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: CLSC 3740
Corequisite: CLSC 4765

CLSC 4750 - Clinical Bacteriology II

This course will discuss the interpretation and analysis of bacterial cultures as organized by specimen source. Antibiotics and antibiotic susceptibility testing will also be discussed. The isolation, identification, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of anaerobic bacteria, mycobacteria, and certain miscellaneous bacteria will also be included.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites : CLSC 3750
Corequisite: CLSC 4765

CLSC 4760 - Molecular Diagnostics and Medical Genetics

This course focuses on the application of molecular methods in the diagnosis of human diseases. Topics include, but are not limited to: biochemical and Mendelian genetics; mutations and mutagens; nucleic acid isolation, purification, quantitation and analysis; protein analysis; lymphocyte culture and chromosome preparation; and the inheritance and pathogenesis of molecular and chromosomal disorders.

Credit Hours: 2
Corequisite: CLSC 4765

CLSC 4765L - Clinical Diagnoses Laboratory

This laboratory will include the discussion and practice of molecular diagnostic and medical genetic techniques. The course will also include advanced topics of laboratory practice including, but not limited to topics such as: 1) the interpretation/analysis of advanced hematological data and abnormal blood smears 2) the interpretation of a variety of bacterial cultures as analyzed by body site.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: CLSC 3740L, CLSC 3750L
Corequisites: CLSC 4740, CLSC 4750, CLSC 4760

CLSC 4770 - Laboratory Education and Research

This course examines the topics of both laboratory education and research. The education topics examined in this course include teaching and learning strategies, instructional design, competency-based education, the development of appropriate grading rubrics, and test development/analysis. Bloom’s taxonomy levels are used to develop objectives and test questions. Objectives are developed using Roger Mager’s format. The research component of this course begins with a discussion of the various types of quantitative and qualitative research designs. Elements of the research process including research questions/ hypotheses, the literature review, data collection, and data analyses/ interpretation are discussed and applied to the field of Clinical Laboratory Sciences. The course participants are required to develop and design projects and/or complete assignments involving the research and educational issues presented in the course.

Credit Hours: 2

CLSC 4775 - Laboratory Management

The principles of laboratory management, which include organizational structure, leadership, management functions and problem solving and decision making are addressed in this course. Human Resource management guidelines and principles are discusses as they relate to laboratory personnel. Legal and ethical issues facing laboratory personnel are presented in this section. Included as topics in the financial management lectures are the fundamentals of financial management, cost analysis, budgeting and reimbursement. The section on laboratory operations encompasses lecture addressing the utilization of personnel, the analysis of workflow and staffing patterns. Methods of preparing for laboratory and hospital accreditation are important aspects of the course, as well as complying with government standards that apply to laboratory practices.

Credit Hours: 2

CLSC 4785 - Immunohematology Practicum

This course is a clinical practicum in immunohematology and includes clinical practice in phlebotomy, immunohematology, immunology, serology, blood donor screening and collection, component preparation and blood banking. This course also includes clinical practice in molecular diagnostics, medical genetics, and cytogenetics.

Credit Hours: Variable (1-5 per semester)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLSC courses

CLSC 4786 - Clinical Chemistry Practicum

This course is a clinical practicum in clinical chemistry and includes the principles and operation of multi-channeled chemistry analyzers, spectrophotometers, osmometers, and electrophoretic equipment.

Credit Hours:
Variable (1-5 per semester)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLSC courses

CLSC 4787 - Hematology Practicum

This course is a clinical practicum in hematology and includes clinical practice in both automated and manual methods in hematology, hemostasis, urinalysis, and body fluids analysis. The course also includes advanced hematological methods including the principles and theories of flow cytometry, antinuclear antibody testing, and specialized testing in coagulation.

Credit Hours:
Variable (1-5 per semester)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLSC courses

CLSC 4788 - Clinical Microbiology Practicum

This course is a clinical practicum in microbiology and includes clinical practice in bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, and virology. Basic techniques such as specimen collection and processing and the performance of various manual/automated methods for biochemical and susceptibility testing are included. Advanced topics include the identification/diagnosis of infectious disease through the use of molecular methods.

Credit Hours:
Variable (1-5 per semester)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLSC courses

CLSC 4795 - Immunohematology Articulation Practicum

This course is a clinical practicum in immunohematology, immunology, and serology with emphasis on advanced/specialized blood banking procedures/techniques such as antibody identification.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLSC courses

CLSC 4796 - Clinical Chemistry Articulation Practicum

This course is a clinical practicum in clinical chemistry with emphasis on advanced/specialized chemistry procedures/techniques such as electrophoresis.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLSC courses

CLSC 4797 - Hematology Articulation Practicum

This course is a clinical practicum in hematology with emphasis on advanced/specialized hematology practices such as flow cytometry, antinuclear antibody testing, and specialized testing in coagulation. The course also includes clinical practice in molecular diagnostics, medical genetics, and cytogenetics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLS courses

CLSC 4798 - Clinical Microbiological Articulation Practicum

This course is a clinical practicum in microbiology with emphasis on advanced/specialized procedures and techniques in the areas of bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, virology, and molecular diagnostics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLS courses

CLSC 4910 - Seminar       

This course focuses on the multidisciplinary discussion of case studies and topics from current Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS) literature. The course also incorporates a review of core CLS curriculum topics in order to aid graduates in preparation for national certification examination.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all applicable didactic and classroom laboratory CLS courses

COMM 1310 - Interpersonal Communication

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of interpersonal interaction with an emphasis on group dynamics.  Students learn strategies for communication with individuals and within various types of groups.

Credit Hours: 3

CSCI 1310 - Computer Applications

This course provides n overview of microcomputer applications including a brief introduction to computer concepts, Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Office Word, Microsoft Office Access, Microsoft Office PowerPoint, Microsoft Outlook, creating web pages, and integration of applications. 

Credit Hours: 3

CSCI 5110 – Advanced Software Applications

This course is designed to provide students with advanced information and technology literacy skills to be successful in a graduate level program.

This course is open to students with senior standing (90+ hours successfully completed

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: CSCI 1310 or equivalent

ENGL 2310 - Introduction to Literature

This course is designed to introduce students to basic features of the three major literary forms: fiction, poetry, and drama. The class meets for three hours per week during regular semesters and six hours per week during the summer semester. Course sessions are interactive. In addition to lecture, sessions include discussion, writing tasks, group activities, and presentations. Two critical analysis papers are required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: WRIT 1311

ENGL 2335 - British Literature I

This course provides a survey of major British literary events and works occurring from the Middle Ages through the 18th century. Course sessions are interactive. One analytical paper is required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311

ENGL 2336 - British Literature II

This course continues the survey of major British literary history begun in ENGL 2335. Study begins with the 19th century and ends with the present day. Course sessions are interactive. One analytical paper is required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: WRIT 1311

ENGL 3340-Literature and Music 

This course examines the relationship of the literary and musical arts.  Comparative study focuses upon various practices, critical theories and social, historical, and philosophical concepts that cross artistic boundaries and influence specific works of literature and/or music.  Class sessions include lecture, discussion, film and studio presentations, and group activities.  Critical thinking is encouraged as students apply concepts to analysis of fiction, poetry, and musical compositions from Western and Non-Western cultures.  One analytical research paper and several short class presentations are required.  The course is team-taught by faculty from the English and the music disciplines.

Successful completion of MUSI 1310 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites:  WRIT 1311;

ENGL 2345 - American Literature I

This course provides a survey of major American literary events and works occurring from the Colonial Period through approximately mid-19th century with the works of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Course sessions are interactive. One analytical paper is required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311

ENGL 2346 - American Literature II

This course continues the survey of major American literary history begun in ENGL 2345. Study begins with the second half of the 19th century and ends with the present day. Course sessions are interactive. One analytical paper is required. 

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: WRIT 1311

ENGL 3310 - Literature and the Visual Arts

This course examines the relationship of the literary and visual arts. Comparative study focuses upon various practices, critical theories, and social, historical, and philosophical concepts that cross artistic boundaries and influence specific works of literature and/or visual arts. Class sessions include lecture, discussion, film, and slide presentations, and group activities. Critical thinking is encouraged as students apply concepts to analysis of fiction, poetry, paintings and sculpture from Western and Non-Western cultures. One analytical research paper and several short class presentations are required. The course is team-taught by faculty from the English and the art disciplines. (credit may be earned for either ENGL 3310 or ART 3310 but not for both)

This course is cross listed with ART 3310

Successful completion of ART 1310 and ENGL 2310 is highly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311  

ENGL 3315 - Studies in Fiction

This course examines the forms, theories and history of the two major forms of fiction: the novel and the short story. Course sessions are interactive. One analytical paper is required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: WRIT 1311

ENGL 3320 - Studies in Poetry

This course examines the forms, theories, and history of poetic literature. Course sessions are interactive. One analytical paper is required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: WRIT 1311

ENGL 3325 - Studies in Dramatic Literature

This course examines the forms, theories, and history of dramatic literature. Course sessions are interactive.  One analytical paper is required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 311

ENGL 3340 - Literature and Music

This course examines the relationship of the literary and musical arts. Comparative study focuses upon various practices, critical theories, and social, historical, and philosophical concepts that cross artistic boundaries and influence specific works of literature and/or music. Class sessions include lecture, discussion, film and audio presentations, and group activities. Critical thinking is encouraged as students apply concepts to analysis of fiction, poetry, and musical compositions from Western and Non-Western cultures. One analytical research paper and several short class presentations are required. The course is team-taught by faculty from the English and the music disciplines. (credit may be earned for either English 3340 or Music 1310 but not for both)

Successful completion of MUSI 1310 and ENGL 2310 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311  

ENGL 4310 - Introduction to Critical Theory

This course presents an historical survey of critical thought about the nature and function of reading, writing and written language. Beginning with the Greek philosophers and ending with postmodernist theorists, students study and apply concepts to specific works of fiction, poetry, drama, history, and biography. Class sessions include lecture, discussion, and group activities. One analytical research paper is required.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL 2310, or permission of the instructor

ENGL 4315 - Special Topics in British Literature

This course focuses upon a specific author, theme, period, or genre in British literary history. Class sessions may include lecture, discussion, and film. One analytical research paper is required. This course may be taken for credit more than once when topics differ.

Successful completion of ENGL 2320 and ENGL 4310 is highly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL 2310, or permission of the instructor

ENGL 4320 - Special Topics in American Literature

This course focuses upon a specific author, theme, period, or genre in American literary history. Class sessions may include lecture, discussion, film, and presentations. One analytical research paper is required. This course may be taken for credit more than once when topics differ.

Successful completion on ENGL 2320 and ENGL 4310 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL 2310 or permission of the instructor

ENGL 4325 – Special Topics in World Literature

This course focuses upon a specific author, theme, period, or genre in the literary heritage of a specific culture other than British or American. Works in translation are assigned. Class sessions may include lecture, discussion, film, and presentations. One analytical research paper is required. This course may be taken for credit more than once when topics differ.

Successful completion of ENGL 2320 and ENGL 4310 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL 2310 or permission of the instructor

ENGL 4630 – Senior Project in English

This independent study course allows senior English majors opportunity to pursue personal interests while practicing skills necessary for scholarly research and critical analysis of a literary work, genre, author, or period. Students who complete this course should be ready to begin graduate studies in an English program. Under close faculty supervision, the student designs and completes a project that must include development of an annotated bibliography and an analytical research paper suitable as a student presentation at a professional conference or for publication in a journal accepting undergraduate writing on a literary subject.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: ENGL 2310, completion of all 2000 and 3000 level requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies with an English concentration.

FOSC 1210 – Forensic Science Survey

This course is an overview of forensic science. The criminal justice system and law enforcement are discussed briefly and related to physical evidence collection and expert witness testimony. Criminalistics, crime analysis, toxicology and forensic molecular biology are discussed in some detail.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: BIOL 1315, 1315L; CHEM 1315, 1315L

FOSC 2210 - Forensic Science Professional Practice

This course is an overview of the forensic scientist as a professional. The scope of the job, accreditation and board certification are discussed. The ethical role of the forensic scientist as an expert witness involved with the identification, collection and presentation of physical evidence is discussed at length.

Credit Hours: 2

FOSC 2310 - Crime Scene Search and Recovery

This course explores the protocol to be used at the crime scene. The course content includes processing methods, documentation, collection and preservation of physical evidence.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOSC 1210 and 2210

FOSC 3310 - Forensic Evidence, Law and Criminal Procedures

The law of criminal procedures and rules of evidence are discussed in detail in this course. Mock trials are held to expose students to practice as expert witnesses.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311, MATH 1315, FOSC 2310

FOSC 3410 - Criminalistics and Crime Analysis

This course is a combination lecture and laboratory course. The techniques used to detect, identify, analyze and compare evidence are described and practiced. Fingerprint collection, hair and fiber analysis, chemical and physical evidence and biological clues are presented.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311, MATH 1315, FOSC 2310

FOSC 4410 - Toxicology

This course is a combination lecture and laboratory course. The course content includes a comprehensive overview of toxins involved in forensic studies.

This course is cross listed with CHEM 4410.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: FOSC 3310, 3410

FOSC 4415 - Forensic Molecular Biology

Various DNA analyses are presented in this course and related to forensic science. In the laboratory, the students will practice DNA procedures.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: FOSC 3310, 3410

FOSC 4710 - Forensic Science Practicum

The course constitutes practical experience in a real crime lab setting.

Credit hours: 6
Prerequisites: FOSC 3310, 3410, 4415

GERO 1310 - Introduction to Gerontology

Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of aging emphasizing biological, psychological, cultural, economic, and social processes. The course also explores gerontology as a career.

Credit Hours: 3

GERO 2310 - Fundamentals of Movement Science

This course presents an overview to the science of human movement through a multidisciplinary approach that includes mechanical, psychological, physiological, anatomical, environmental, and sociological conceptions. Throughout the course the effects of aging on human movement are integrated.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: GERO 1310 or permission form the Program Director

GERO 3310 - Health Promotion and Aging

Principles of health promotion surveying physiological, psychological and social health problems, and the changing health of adults during the middle and later years. This course focuses on the challenges facing older adults and on strategies to promote successful aging.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: GERO 1310 or permission from the Program Director

GERO 3315 - The Physiology of Aging

Lecture and discussion of the effects of normative aging processes on homeostatic mechanisms and how these changes relate to development of disorders and diseases in later life.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Junior standing; GERO 1310, GERO 3410

GERO 3320 - Aging and Disabilities

An examination of the disablement process, chronic disease, and aging. Issues and implications of disablement are discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Junior standing; GERO 3315

GERO 3410 - Exercise in Health and Disease

The course examines the role of exercise in health and disease, including acute and chronic effects of exercise for individuals with chronic diseases. In addition, this course explores exercise prescriptions, training guidelines, and therapeutic benefits of exercise intervention and rehabilitation.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: Junior standing; BIOL 2310, BIOL 2310L; GERO 2310

GERO 4310 - Gerontology Practicum

Supervised experience in one or more community agencies that serve older adults.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Senior standing: GERO 1310

GERO 4910 - Directed Research in Aging

Individual readings and research leading to the preparation of a senior paper.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: Senior standing: GERO 1310

HESC 3310 - Educating in the Health Professions

This course is designed to provide health professionals with skills and competencies for designing effective learning environments for the education of their peers and patients. The course included identifying, developing, and practicing instructional techniques that affect teacher performance and students learning.

Credit Hours: 3

HIST 1310 - World History I

This course introduces basic historical concepts and seeks to impart information regarding the sweep of human history. Major movements and personalities in world history are highlighted. Further, the course focuses upon the factors, which have impacted the development of the major cultures of our world, and establishes a foundation for developing an understanding of the forces, which continue to shape the modern world.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

HIST 1311 - World History II

This course is a continuation of HIST 1310. This course will discuss and describe the forces that have shaped and developed our world from the year 1650 to the present day.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

HIST 1315 - American History I

This course is a survey course of United States history. This course will discuss and described the significant events of American History from the discovery to 1876.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

HIST 1316 - American History II

This course is a continuation of HIST 1315. The significant events of American History from 1876 to the present day will be described and discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:  WRIT 1310

HIST 2310 - Louisiana History

The course will introduce students to basic Louisiana history.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:  WRIT 1310

HIST 2315 - African-American History

The course will provide students with an overview of African-American history from the early seventeenth century to the present.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:  WRIT 1310

HSER 1210 - Professions in Healthcare Management

This course is an introduction to the many healthcare management professions that are available to students who plan to consider this as their profession at some point in their career. The various professions will be outlined with certain job expectations and duties, career paths, salaries, challenges and opportunities. Guest speakers will be invited to the classroom to offer first-hand experience and scenarios that will help expedite that particular career path. Even if students do not plan to be a manager, understanding some key roles in the healthcare profession can help the student be a more effective co-worker, team member, and organizational citizen.  

Credit Hours: 2

HSER 2315 - Introduction to Accounting

This course focuses on accounting as the language of business and emphasizes the terminology used in accounting. The course exposes the students to the language of business enabling them to make decisions and informed judgments about the economic activities of our society.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite:  Sophomore Standing; MATH 1315

HSER 2320 - Macroeconomics in Healthcare

This course is a study of macroeconomics, with a health care focus. It emphasizes supply and demand for the various health care goods and services (hospital care, physician services, nursing care, etc.), and analyzing problems related to economic growth, employment and inflation. It also includes an analysis of the role of government in the distribution and subsidization of health care services. Current relevant topics such as global economics and national health insurance are also evaluated.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing; MATH 1315

HSER 3340 - Healthcare Systems and Trends

This course is an introduction to the health care delivery system in the United States including discussions about the various trends. Classes will be conducted as forums of discussion emphasizing contemporary issues related to health care professionals, facilities, organization patterns, reimbursement, and quality of care. Classes will combine lectures, discussions, current events, debates, and exams.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor
Corequisite: HSER 3360, HSER 3370, HSER 3380 or permission from the instructor and/or Program Director

HSER 3350 - Healthcare Management

Introduction to the principles for management for organizations that deliver health care services such as hospitals, nursing homes, multi-specialty clinics, and home health care agencies. Concepts and theories from the general management literature that are particularly helpful in organization and management of health care organizations will be surveyed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor
Corequisite: HSER 3370, HSER 4320, HSER 4340

HSER 3360 - Microeconomics in Healthcare

The health care economy is of special interest because of its size in the US economy and because of the profound effect that health and the lack of health can have on every individual. This course provides a focused look at the economics of the health sector and the major issues that motivate the current attempts at health care reform.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite:  HSER 2320
Corequisite: HSER 3340, HSER 4330, HSER 4340 or permission from the instructor

HSER 3370 - Quality Improvement in Healthcare

This course will focus on the tools needed to implement quality measures and systematically monitor and evaluate outcomes in a healthcare organization to ensure excellence in healthcare. Important concepts of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI), Total Quality Management (TQM) and teamwork will be used to describe the principles of quality management. Other topics will include: the impact of managed care on Quality Management, Health Employer Data Information Set (HEDIS) indicators, accreditation, and the impact of consumers on the quality of healthcare. Issues of utilization management, risk management, provider credentialing and liability as they relate to Quality Management will be covered. Development of studies and benchmarking along with basic applicable statistical elements will be part of the course.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 2315
Corequisite: HSER 3340, HSER 3350

HSER 3380 - Managerial Accounting in Healthcare

Basic accounting and managerial concepts and applications in health care organizations are presented, such as financial statements, cash flow and costs. Students further learn and appreciate the impact of the health care reimbursement structure, regulatory mechanisms and organizational challenges health administrators must consider.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite:  HSER 2315; declared Major in Health Services Administration
Corequisites: HSER 3340; HSER 4320; HSER 4340

HSER 3390 - Human Resources in Healthcare Management

This course surveys problems and issues in labor economics and relations, as well as personnel management. Emphasis is placed on public policies affecting management and union representatives and on the role of the human resource manager in the healthcare organization. Discussion topics include: equal employment opportunity; job analysis, design, description, and evaluation; wage and salary administration; recruitment and selection; personnel testing; assessing employee performance; communication; training and development; retention; and employee discipline. Other areas of topic can include the improvement of productivity (primarily through the enhancement of team functioning) and challenges in healthcare human resource management.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 3350, HSER 3360, HSER 4340; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4310 - Financial Management in Healthcare

This course will build on the coursework found in HSER 3380, but will focus more on the financial issues related to reimbursement structures, regulatory mechanisms, cost control and budgeting as it relates to health care. Other topics related to this course will include budgeting, financial analysis, financing, and capital investment decisions.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 3380; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4320 - Reimbursements in Healthcare

Various forms of reimbursement in the United States health care system are discussed. History, basic principles and organizational structure of insurance, managed care, government programs, and consumer driven policies are analyzed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 3360
Corequisites HSER 3350, HSER 3380; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4330 - Marketing in Healthcare

This course teaches the fundamentals of marketing for healthcare services. It is designed to cover the following: marketing process, understanding the consumer and the marketing mix. Students will be introduced to the process of the development of marketing strategies and analysis in a health care setting. Topics will include: the nature of marketing strategy and the environment in which marketing operates; understanding the consumer; distribution and pricing, product, promotion strategies.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 3350, HSER 3380
Corequisites: HSER 3360; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4340 - Legal Aspects of Health Service Administration

This course is an introduction to the law as it relates to health care settings. It provides an overview of health care law aimed at assisting students in developing an intuitive sense for what the laws will permit them to do, and for when to consult legal counsel. Unit Topics such as contracts, negligence, damages, workers compensation, litigation and trial proceedings will be covered.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 3340
Corequisites: HSER 3350, HSER 3360,  HSER 3380; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4345 - Ambulatory Practice Management

This course will offer students practical insight on how to manage an ambulatory care practice. The topics make up a comprehensive review for those preparing for a career in practice management. Topics include operations, financial management, strategic planning, regulation and risk management, human resources, and community relations.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 4310, HSER 4320, HSER 4340; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4350 - Policy in Healthcare

Major relevant policy issues in the United States health care system, past, present and future, are discussed. Potential changes and consequences of implemented regulations and policies are also presented and analyzed.

Enrollment is HSER 4340 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisites: HSER 4310, HSER 4320; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4360 - Managerial Epidemiology

Epidemiological and Public Health concepts and methods in a variety of settings and across a spectrum of disease topics are discussed. Social, physical and biological determinants of selected infectious and chronic diseases are studied. Epidemiological tools presented include vital statistics, rates, and methods of descriptive, observational and experimental studies. In addition, literature review, analytical problem solving and managerial decision-making skills are acquired.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 3350, HSER 3360; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4370 - Capstone in Healthcare Management

This course will integrate theory and practice by examining issues and solutions to problems in the management of health services organizations. It functions as a capstone for the health services administration program, allowing students to apply coursework from across the curriculum.

Successful completion of HSER 4340 and HSER 4350 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 3370, HSER 3390, HSER 4310, HSER 4320, 4330; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4380 - Information Systems in Healthcare

Survey of the technology and processes used in management information systems. The role of management information systems in health care organizations is presented.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HSER 3350, HSER 3360, HSER 3380, successful completion of a 4000-level HSER course; declared Major in Health Services Administration

HSER 4910 - Internship/Practicum

Placement in a health care agency and completion of a project in one or more areas of health service administration is a large component of this course. Seminars for participant presentations will be conducted.

HSER 4910 is to be completed during the last semester.

Credit Hours: Variable (2-6)
Prerequisites: HSER 3370, HSER 3390, HSER 4310, HSER 4320, HSER 4330. ; declared Major in Health Services Administration

LTCA 1310 - Introduction to Long-Term Care Administration

This course examines basic and advanced concepts of the long-term care environment with an emphasis on understanding the current delivery system and the unique challenges faced by each service and practitioners on varying levels. 

Credit Hours: 3

LTCA 2310 - Administrative Issues in Aging

This course explores long-term care and administration. The course reviews a description of the clients, services, and provider settings in long-term care. Reimbursement and regulation of long-term care providers, ethical issues, and quality improvement are special topics. The second half of the course examines long-term care settings such as nursing homes, assisted living, subacute care, adult day care, home care, and hospice care.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: LTCA 1310

LTCA 2315 - Clinicals - Administrator in Training

Clinical instruction providing training and work-based experience, and direct patient/client care is the primary focus of this course. This course may serve as the AIT requirement necessary for board examination and licensure and may take two semesters to complete depending on the Louisiana Board of Nursing Home Examiners’ recommendation.  Arrangements for assignment to a nursing home facility must be completed during the semester prior to enrollment in this course.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: LTCA 2310

MATH 0310 - Introduction to Algebra

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the computational skills needed to study College Algebra. Problem solving is emphasized throughout the course. This is a one-semester course covering standard topics such as linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions, radicals and complex numbers, and quadratic functions and inequalities.  (NOT for degree credit )

Credit Hours: 3

MATH 1315 - College Algebra

The purpose of College algebra is to provide the student with computational skills needed to solve a variety of problems. The student will see a wide range of techniques and strategies applied to problem solving. Problem solving is emphasized throughout the course. This is a one semester course covering such standard topics as functions and graphs, polynomial functions, graphs and zeros, rational functions and conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations and inequalities.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ACT Math sub-score of at least 18 or SAT Math sub-score of at least 1290

MATH 1320 - Plane Trigonometry

This course will be presented through the use of cooperative and interactive learning. Critical thinking and open-ended questions and explorations will be used when appropriate. Problem solving will be emphasized throughout the course. This is a one semester course covering such standard topics as: trigonometric functions and identities, inverse trigonometric functions, graphs, solving triangles and equations, complex numbers and polar coordinates. Students will study the definitions of the trigonometric functions. Relationships between trigonometric functions will be studied as identities are established. The identities are particularly needed by students going on to a course in calculus. Graphs will give a geometric representation for both trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1315

MATH 2310 - Calculus

This course will provide an introduction to differential and integral calculus for students majoring in the life sciences (Biology, Medicine) as well as the behavioral sciences. The topics will include: limits, the first and second derivative, the first and second derivative tests for relative extrema, the definite and indefinite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Calculus will be used to solve real world problems, including those associated with the interpretation of medical and biological data.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1315

MATH 2315 - General Statistics

This course introduces the students to both descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis is placed on applications of making decisions in the presence of uncertainty. In order to provide hands on experiences to the students, a number of activities will be made available. This is a one semester course providing an introduction to standard topics such as the organization of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, probability distributions for discrete and continuous random values, the normal distribution, statistical inference, the standard normal distribution, Chi-square distribution, inference concerning two population parameters, regression and correlation, analysis of variance, and nonparametric statistics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1315

MATH 2315L - General Statistics Laboratory

Students work and complete problem assignments, etc., for MATH 2315, General Statistics. Tutorials will be presented (Class meets 3 hrs per week).

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: MATH 1315
Corequisites: MATH 2315

MHCA 5310 – Quantitative Methods and Decision Analysis

This course provides the student with a working knowledge of research methods for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting healthcare data, and an appreciation of the value and application of these methods in healthcare organizations. Students will learn to distinguish between types of research (quantitative and qualitative) with an emphasis on the use of quantitative analysis in healthcare organizations. Basic research methods are described including surveys, observational studies, experimental and quasi-experimental design, use of primary and secondary data, and statistical techniques for analyzing and interpreting data, including descriptive statistics, hypotheses testing, probability, sampling, tests of significance, chi-square analysis, correlation, linear regression, and multiple regression. Selected mathematical, statistical, and computer applications and statistical techniques applied to decision making in hospitals and healthcare organizations will be introduced.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the MHA program or program director approval

MHCA 5315 – Healthcare Economics

This course focuses on the application of macro and micro economic tools to the healthcare industry. Content includes demand management; concepts of efficiency, production and distribution of healthcare services; impact of regulation and reimbursement; competitive markets and market failure; benefit cost analysis; demand estimation and forecasting; decision-making under risk and uncertainty; and economic incentives in healthcare. Students apply principles to a variety of business models.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the MHA program or program director approval

MHCA 5320 – Healthcare Management and Governance

This course will explore the role of the contemporary healthcare manager, while creating a sense of responsibility by governing boards of voluntary hospitals and to enable them to interrelate with them appropriately and constructively. The substance on interrelationships between governing boards and management is as varied as are the forms of the organizations to which they relate and the personalities of the individuals involved. Subjective perceptions are often more important than formal rules and effective governance is more art than science. This course provides guidelines to this art.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the MHA program or program director approval

MHCA 5325 – Healthcare Systems

This course will analyze the U.S. healthcare system, along with other international healthcare systems. Focus will include the historical context; systems theory; analysis of organizational components; health services personnel; national, state, and local government roles; financing mechanisms; demography; mortality and morbidity; quality assurance; political issues; and trends in progress.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the MHA program or program director approval

MHCA 5330 – Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Information Systems

This course explores the assessment, planning, and implementation of information technology projects.  This course also provides the student with an overview of the health care information systems with a specific focus on “Electronic Medical Records" (EMRs) and the role of health information technology in supporting business decisions. This course will expose students to the concepts and knowledge involved in making strategic use of information technology (IT) in health care organizations. It will clarify how to establish IT linkages to business, planning, and governance. In addition it will introduce students to technology management through the analysis of the lifecycle of IT, IT architecture, systems.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the MHA program or program director approval

MHCA 5335 – Social, Ethical, and Legal Aspects of Healthcare Organizations

The challenges of patient-centered care require an understanding of the complex ethical and legal issues, mandates and best practices are analyzed. Analysis of selected legal principles and their application to health field are included. Legal aspects of corporate liability, medical malpractice, admission and discharge processes, medical staff bylaws, informed consent, nursing, patients' rights, medical records, and governmental regulation of personnel and health facilities are also evaluated. Analysis of case studies and resolution implications are explored.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the MHA program or program director approval

MHCA 5340 – Essentials of Health and Human Disease

Essentials of health and human disease related to normal and abnormal physiology.  The nature and function of health in society and their implication in the processes of health and illness in the human organism will be explored.  Content will focus on human disease and the body's response to the disease process and the effects on normal function. 

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the MHA program or program director approval

MHCA 6310 – Leadership and Professional Development

This course offers an in-depth examination of factors that contribute to successful executive leadership practice in a wide variety of organizational settings. Topics include what leadership is, the challenges leaders face, the impact leadership has and how leaders build organizations and key relationships. Emphasis is placed on leadership knowledge, approach, and application.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MHCA 5320, MHCA 5325 or program director approval

MHCA 6315 – Organizational Theory and Behavior

This course will use applications in health services organizations and relate them to topics that include group behavior and it processes, organizational structure, organization/environment relationships, organizational performance, power and leadership, perception, attitudes, motivation, communication and group dynamics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MHCA 5320, MHCA 5325 or program director approval

MHCA 6320 – Healthcare Financial Management Analysis and Applications

Analysis of financial information is central to financial control, forecasting, and decision making. It is also central to the evaluation of managed care operations, competitors, or merger candidates. This course gives students insight into financial statement analysis, cash flow projections, capital budget evaluation, working capital management, and the primary methods of financing the corporation (both for-profit and not-for-profit models are emphasized). Various measure of risk and methods of assessing the risk-return trade-off are also presented.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MHCA 5315 or program director approval

MHCA 6325 – Quality and Performance Improvement

This course applies the customer driven process involving team and process thinking with the application of statistical tools used in a way to show how work is accomplished. Provides students with knowledge, skills and tools necessary to implement, facilitate, and coordinate continuous quality improvement activities in healthcare environments. Focuses on “world class" performance systems and processes in healthcare, the class will explore the best practice methods of performance improvement.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MHCA 5325, MHCA 5330, MHCA 5340 or program director approval

MHCA 6330 – Human Resource Management

This course will provide insight to human resources management issues, including strategic role of employee selection, appraisal, rewards, and development, applications to healthcare sector, labor relations, and unique aspects of labor law relevant to healthcare organizations.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MHCA 5320, MHCA 5325 or program director approval

MHCA 6335 – Healthcare Marketing and Strategic Planning

Discusses and applies the concepts of healthcare marketing and planning to healthcare delivery, assessment of community needs and resource planning in both ambulatory and clinical settings. Includes health services planning and trends, demand for and use of health services, research methods and sources of marketing and planning data. Consumer behavior, market segmentation, target marketing, marketing research, management, and control of marketing mix variables are applied. Topics include strategic analysis of a firm’s activities from the marketer’s point of view. Gives attention to marketing strategy formulation, implementation and control. Assesses strategies for the functional areas of marketing and their relevant application. This course applies the use of design, development and evaluation methodology to analyze strategic planning processes. Development and execution of marketing plans integral to branding and promotion are explored. Examines the tools and techniques of managing marketing activities as well as an analysis of the marketing process. Emphasizes decision-making, the refinement of skills needed to recognize and solve marketing problems, and effective communication of recommendations.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MHCA 5310, MHCA 5325 or program director approval

MHCA 6340 – Health Policy Formulation, Implementation, and Analysis

Analyzes key contemporary issues in healthcare policy. Includes design and structure of the U.S. healthcare system, policy making process, initiatives and the roles of government, the private sector, consumers and advocacy groups in setting policy agenda.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MHCA 5315, MHCA 5335 or program director approval

MHCA 6345 – Integrated Capstone

This course offers an exploration of concepts connected to internal and external organizational entrepreneurship. Topics include grant development, public relations, and community service.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all foundational MHA coursework or program director approval

MHCA 6610 – Residency

This course provides a structured field experience focusing on mentoring relations with preceptor, observation of management processes within health services organizations, and application of administrative theory and techniques. This course is taken in the student’s final semester.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all foundational MHA coursework or program director approval

MHCA 6615 – Applied Project

The Master’s Applied Project is scheduled for the final academic year, and consequently viewed as the final assessment component of the MHA program. Project supervision is conducted individually and takes the form of supervisory meetings. In addition to writing the Master’s Applied Project, the student is expected to make a public presentation during which s/he presents and defends her/his research results. When a student completes all the degree course subjects and the Master’s project, s/he is eligible for graduation.

This course requires the student to conduct and prepare the written Applied Project under the supervision of a faculty committee. The Applied Project is written in traditional academic style. In addition, the Applied Project must be article-ready, but it is not required to be accepted for publication. The student will prepare the paper in a peer-reviewed journal article manuscript format. The student must complete an oral defense of the Applied Project. The student must maintain continuous enrollment in MHCA 6615 until the requirements are completed and the Applied Project is approved by the Dean. This course may be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all foundational MHA coursework or program director approval

MUSI 1310 - Music Appreciation

This course provides the student with the tools for understanding the interaction of music and civilization from a historical perspective. To better relate to the vast body of literature basic concepts of music are taught and the student is given the terminology needed to make cogent commentary on the music of different eras. The discussion includes references to the visual arts and aspects of history as they relate to the development of music through the ages. The theoretical study is supplemented by the use of audio and audiovisual technology. Course sessions are interactive, incorporating lectures, discussions, and listening sessions. Attendance at two (or more) live concerts is required during the semester.

Credit Hours: 3

NURS 1110 - Transition to Accelerated Nursing Education

This course is designed to assist the student in achieving educational goals. A variety of skills related to learning in an accelerated format are presented. Skills including studying for accelerated classes, test taking, and time management will aid the student in adapting to the accelerated pace. Also, skills in using the library, reading research, and writing in APA format will help to prepare the student for the rigors of accelerated nursing education.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: Admission to the accelerated ASN program

NURS 1310 - Pharmacology in Nursing

This course focuses on basic principles of pharmacology, drug regulations, major drug classifications, and the registered nurse’s role in medication administration. Emphasis is placed on nursing implications of drug therapy, including legal/ethical, psychosocial, developmental, religious, and cultural considerations. Students utilize math skills to calculate drug dosages.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to either the traditional or accelerated ASN program; Permission required for those seeking entry into the LPN-RN Transition program; ACSM 1110, WRIT 1310, MATH 1315, BIOL 2310, PSYC 1310, and CHEM 1310 or CHEM 1315.

NURS 1710 - Foundations of Nursing Practice

This course provides the student with foundational knowledge and skills essential to the practice of nursing. Concepts related to nursing as a profession, standards of care, professional ethics, nursing roles, communication, cultural awareness, holistic care, nursing process, critical-thinking, teaching-learning process, collaboration, and community are presented. Developmental concepts are discussed with a focus on the elderly and the normal process of aging. Students perform basic psychomotor skills in a laboratory setting. The concepts and techniques of interviewing, history-taking, review of systems, and physical assessment are introduced. Emphasis is placed on the assessment skills necessary to determine the holistic health care needs of the adult client. The course also provides the student with fundamental knowledge of pathophysiological stressors commonly encountered by adults. Clinical experiences enable the beginning student to begin to develop assessment skills, communication skills, cultural awareness, nursing process, critical-thinking skills, teaching skills, and psychomotor skills consistent with the care provider role in chronic care and community-based settings.

Classroom Hours: 4 (60 contact hours) Clinical Hours: 3 (135 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 7
Prerequisites: Admission to either the traditional or accelerated ASN program
Corequisites: BIOL 2311, BIOL 2320, NURS 1310

NURS 1715 - Adult Health Nursing I

This course focuses on the role of the nurse in promoting, maintaining, and restoring health for adults with commonly occurring health problems. Students use the nursing process to formulate care plans/maps for individuals experiencing integumentary, metabolic, respiratory, and cardiovascular problems. Clinical experiences provide the student with the opportunity to develop assessment skills, communication skills, cultural awareness, nursing process, critical-thinking skills, teaching skills, and psychomotor skills in acute and community-based settings. Students develop beginning collaborative skills with individuals, families, peers, and healthcare providers in the delivery of nursing care.

Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 2 (90 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: NURS 1310, NURS 1710
Corequisites: PSYC 2330, BIOL 2325, BIOL 2325L

NURS 1720 - Mental Health Nursing

This course focuses on concepts basic to psychiatric-mental health nursing including neurobiology, therapeutic communication, cultural diversity, spirituality, family dynamics, loss and grieving, stress and coping, crisis intervention, violence, abuse, psychiatric disorders, and community resources. Mental health issues across the life span are explored. The course introduces specialized assessment and communication skills necessary for the care of the individual experiencing situational and maturational stressors as well as mental illness. Clinical experiences provide the student with the opportunity to enhance assessment skills, communication skills, cultural awareness, nursing process, critical-thinking skills, teaching skills, and collaborative skills in acute mental health in-patient, chemical dependency, outpatient, and adolescent units.

Note: Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 1 (45 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: NURS 1310, NURS 1710
Corequisites: PSYC 2330, BIOL 2325, BIOL 2325L

NURS 1725 - LPN - RN Role Transition

This course is designed to assist the LPN to transition into the ASN curriculum. The course focuses on validating skills and reinforcing knowledge for which advanced placement has been granted. The concepts of nursing process, physical assessment, role transition, professional values, and legal-ethical issues are addressed. The course incorporates a review of mental health concepts and medical-surgical problems presented in the first year of the ASN curriculum. Clinical experiences in acute care settings enable the student to apply theory to practice.

Classroom Hours: 5 (75 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 2 (90 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 7
Prerequisites: Admission to the LPN-RN Transition program

NURS 1730 – Introduction to Nursing Concepts

This course introduces the student to the role of the professional nurse practicing within today’s healthcare system. The course is an introduction to nursing concepts for students who are considering professional nursing as a career. Laboratory and clinical experiences provide opportunities for development of foundational nursing skills.

Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 1 (45 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: Must be a pre-nursing student and have completed the following courses with a grade of "C" or better: ACSM 1110, WRIT 1310, MATH 1315, CHEM 1310, BIOL 2310, BIOL 2310L, and PSYC 1310.

NURS 2310 - Pathophysiology

The course emphasizes the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function across the lifespan and the resulting human response.

Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the BSN program and have earned a grade of "C" or better in required pre-nursing courses or have the Dean's approval

NURS 2710 - Adult Health Nursing II

This course focuses on the role of the nurse in promoting, maintaining, and restoring health for adults with commonly occurring health problems. Students use the nursing process to formulate care plan/maps for individuals experiencing surgery and nutritional/ metabolic, elimination, hematological, and musculoskeletal problems. Clinical learning experiences in acute and community-based settings enable the student to further develop assessment skills, communication skills, cultural awareness, nursing process, critical-thinking skills, teaching skills, psychomotor skills, and collaborative skills.

Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 2 (90 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: NURS 1715, NURS 1720; for the LPN-RN Transition student - NURS1725
Corequisite: WRIT 1311 (only for those enrolled in the traditional ASN program or the LPN-RN Transition program)

NURS 2715 - Care of Children and Families

This course focuses on the physiological, developmental, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual health care of the child within the family unit. The nursing process, concepts of family dynamics, legal-ethical principles, and community resources are used by the students to promote, maintain, and restore optimum functioning of the family unit. Emphasis is placed on age-related health risks and common childhood health problems. Clinical experiences provide the student with opportunities to refine assessment skills, communication skills, cultural awareness, nursing process, critical-thinking skills, teaching skills, psychomotor skills, and collaborative skills in acute and community-based settings.

Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 1 (45 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: NURS 1715, NURS 1720; for the LPN-RN Transition student – NURS 1725
Corequisite: WRIT 1311 (only for those enrolled in the traditional ASN program or the LPN-RN Transition program)

NURS 2720 - Care of Women and Neonates

This course explores the concepts and skills necessary for the nursing care of childbearing families and newborn infants. The childbirth process from conception to postpartum is discussed. The course focuses on the role of the nurse in promoting, maintaining, and restoring health for the childbearing family and newborns including both normal and high-risk pregnancy. The course also includes topics related to women's health such as fertility and infertility, menopause, sexually transmitted diseases, and female reproductive disorders. Clinical experiences provide the opportunity to refine assessment skills, communication skills, cultural awareness, nursing process, critical-thinking skills, teaching skills, psychomotor skills, and collaborative skills.

Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 1 (45 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: NURS 2710, NURS 2715
Corequisite: RELS 1310 (only for those enrolled in the traditional ASN program or the LPN-RN Transition program)

NURS 2725 - Adult Health Nursing III

This course focuses on the role of the nurse in promoting, maintaining, and restoring health for adults experiencing life-threatening problems. Emphasis is placed on the decision-making process required for complex clinical situations and collaboration between disciplines. Clinical learning experiences allow the student to integrate the theory content with actual clinical experiences in acute care settings. This course emphasizes transition to practice focusing on role development and socialization into nursing. The role of the nurse as a member of a profession is presented. In addition, leadership and management principles, ethical decision-making, the use of research, patient advocacy, and cultural competence as integral components of nursing practice for the associate degree nurse in caring for individuals, families, and groups are examined.

Note: Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 3 (135 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: NURS 2710, NURS 2715
Corequisite: RELS 1310 (only for those enrolled in the traditional ASN program or the LPN-RN Transition program)

NURS 2730 – Pharmacology

This course focuses on basic principles of pharmacology, drug regulations, major drug classifications, and the registered nurse’s role in proper dosage calculation and medication administration across the lifespan. Holistic and ethical considerations in drug therapy are explored. The spirit of inquiry is promoted as students ask questions about current nursing practice related to medication therpay. Laboratory experiences provide opportunities for students to develop selected competencies.

Classroom Hours: 4 (45 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 4
Corequisite: NURS 2310

NURS 2735 – Role Transition for the LPN

This course is designed to assist the LPN to transition into the BSN curriculum. The course focuses on validating knowledge for which advanced placement has been granted. Emphasis is placed on role transition, holistic and comprehensive assessment, pathophysiology, and pharmacology based on the BSN constructs and concepts. The spirit of inquiry is promoted as students ask questions about current nursing practice. Clinical experiences allow students to apply theory to practice.

Classroom Hours: 4 (60 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 2 (90 contact hours)


Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: Admission to the LPN-BSN Transition Program


NURS 2740 – Health Assessment

This course presents the information and skills needed to conduct a comprehensive and holistic nursing assessment of individuals across the lifespan. Additionally, students are introduced to family and community assessments. The spirit of inquiry is promoted as students ask questions about current practice related to nursing assessment. Laboratory and clinical experiences provide opportunities for skill development.

Classroom Hours: 2 (30 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 2 (90 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 4
Corequisites: NURS 2310, 2730

NURS 3310 - Research in Nursing Practice

This course explores a broad range of methods of disciplined inquiry within nursing and establishes a basis for research in nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the research process and critiquing published research. Appropriate methods of analysis used in research are presented and data analysis techniques are applied to published research articles.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the RN-BSN program or permission from the program coordinator
Corequisite: MATH 2315

NURS 3315 - Pathophysiology for the RN: A Basis for Nursing Care

Emphasis is on the physiological manifestations which are the result of pathophysiologic processes. Clinical situations are utilized to incorporate critical thinking, interpretation of data, indicated nursing care, and expected patient outcomes. The course builds upon and expands previous nursing knowledge and knowledge gained in anatomy, physiology, microbiology, and nutrition.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the RN-BSN program

NURS 3320 - Health Assessment for the RN

This course prepares the student to use assessment tools and techniques in determining the health status of clients across the lifespan. Students apply knowledge from health and social sciences and utilize the critical-thinking process as a method to identify appropriate nursing interventions. The course is designed to provide opportunities for enhancing competency in assessment skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, and determination of nursing interventions.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the RN-BSN program

NURS 3325 - Leadership Principles in Nursing

This course provides the student with knowledge and skills to function as a nursing leader and/or manager within a dynamic practice environment. Concepts of leadership, group dynamics, power, problem-solving, change, conflict, and ethical decision-making are addressed from a nursing perspective. Managerial functions such as staffing, performance appraisal, delegation, communication, team building, planning, and budget preparation are introduced. Issues such as regulatory constraints, professional liability, and quality of care are also explored.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Admission to the RN-BSN program

NURS 3330 – Special Topics in Nursing

This course addresses issues or content of topical interest and value within a discipline or program offered by Nursing.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of 30 semester credit hours and a grade point average of 2.7 or higher


NURS 3710 – Nursing Concepts I

This course focuses on the professional nurse's role in assisting individuals and families in promoting, maintaining, and restoring health across the lifespan. The spirit of inquiry is further developed as students are introduced to the research process. Clinical experiences provide the student with the opportunity to use the nursing process and develop selected nursing competencies across the continuum of care.

Classroom Hours: 4 (60 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 3 (135 contact hours)


Credit Hours: 7
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 2000 level nursing courses and BIOL 2320 with a grade of "C" or better


NURS 3720 – Nursing Concepts II

This course focuses on the professional nurse's role in assisting communities and populations  in promoting, maintaining, and restoring health across the lifespan. Students are introduced to basic methods of disciplined inquiry related to communities and populations. Clinical experiences provide the student with the opportunity to assess and partner with selected communities using the nursing process.  

Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 2 (80 contact hours)

Credit Hours: 5
Corequiste: NURS 3710


NURS 3730 – Nursing Concepts III

The course explores the concepts, skills, and ethical principles necessary for holistic nursing care of vulnerable individuals and families. Students further refine disciplined inquiry skills by critiquing and using published research. Clinical experiences provide the student with the opportunity for further development of selected nursing competencies across the healthcare continuum.
 
Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 4 (180 contact hours)


Credit Hours: 7
Prerequisites: NURS 3710; NURS 3720; MATH 2315

NURS 3740 – Nursing Concepts IV

The course explores the concepts, skills, and ethical principles necessary for holistic nursing care of vulnerable communities and populations. Students further refine disciplined inquiry skills by critiquing and using published research concerning best practices. Clinical experiences provide the student with the opportunity for further development of nursing competencies while collaborating with community partners.
 
Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 2 (90 contact hours)


Credit Hours: 5
Corequisite: NURS 3730


NURS 4110 - Independent Study

This course offers the student an opportunity for an individualized project in an area related to the student's special interest. The student, in collaboration with the faculty, develops a contract designed to enhance professional nursing practice.

Credit Hours: 1-3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 3000 level nursing courses or with approval of the Program Coordinator

NURS 4310 – Successful Aging

This course focuses on the concept of successful aging and is designed to enhance the nurse's awareness of the needs and potentials of the older adult. The course analyzes the sociological, psychological, and physiological aspects of aging. Students explore theories of aging, chronic and acute problems of the aging client, available community resources, and issues impacting health promotion of the older adult.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 3000 level nursing courses or with approval of the Program Coordinator

NURS 4315 - Nursing in the 21st Century

This course explores the changing health care system, its impact upon patient care and relevance to nursing practice. Factors contributing to health care changes in the 21st century will be examined and the nurse's role as patient advocate will be analyzed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 3000 level nursing courses or with approval of the Program Coordinator

NURS 4320 - Mental Health and Film

This course focuses on the portrayal of mental illness in film. Emphasis is placed on analyzing and critiquing the depiction of psychopathologies as portrayed in real-life, real-world situations.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 3000 level nursing courses

NURS 4325 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Nursing

This course provides the student the opportunity to explore issues encountered in professional nursing practice relating to ethical and legal situations. Course content is based on standards of nursing practice from the American Nurses Association, legal principles, ethical theories, and the American Nurses Code. Emphasis is placed on the student's analysis of issues to increase his/her ability to creatively examine and apply ethical and legal principles in nursing practice.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 3000 level nursing courses

NURS 4710 - Community Nursing

Community Nursing focuses on the historical perspective, political, health care systems, epidemiology, and nursing care of specific target groups. Health promotion and protection activities are emphasized as they relate to families, aggregates, and communities. Diverse roles of the community health nurse are examined and a community assessment is completed using research and data processing skills. A clinical practicum provides an opportunity to participate in health promotion activities within the community.

Note: Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours) Clinical Hours : 2 (90 contact hours) 

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: Completion of all 3000 level nursing courses

NURS 4750 – Nursing Concepts V

The course explores the concepts and skills necessary for holistic, evidence-based nursing care of individuals and families experiencing complex alterations in health. Clinical experiences provide the student with the opportunity to redefine selected nursing competencies across the healthcare continuum.

Classroom Hours: 2 (30 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 4 (180 contact hours)


Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: NURS 3730; NURS 3740

NURS 4760 – Nursing Concepts VI

The course explores the concepts and skills necessary for holistic nursing care of communities and populations addressing complex health concerns across the globe. Healthcare system influences such as power, politics, and policy are explored. Students use disciplined inquiry while compiling evidence around a topic of interest. Clinical experiences provide opportunities to refine community health nursing competencies and the nurse manager's role.

Classroom Hours: 3 (45 contact hours). Clinical Hours: 2 (90 contact hours)


Credit Hours: 5
Corequisite: NURS 4750

NURS 4790 – Clinical Immersion

This course provides opportunities for the integration and synthesis of scientific knowledge with clinical nursing practice and the development of the professional nursing role. Building on the content from prior courses, students manage care for individuals, families, communities, and populations with a dedicated section on care of the older adult.

Credit Hours: 4 (180 contact hours)
Prerequisites: NURS 4750; NURS 4760

NURS 4910 - Transition into Practice

This course focuses on the transition into the role of the professional nurse. Special attention is given to licensure, accountability, NCLEX-RN testing, and scope of practice. Students complete the portfolio initiated upon admission to the BSN program.

Credit Hours: 2 (30 contact hours)
Corequisites: NURS 4790; NURS 4915. This course must be taken in the graduating semester with NURS 4915.



NURS 4915 – Capstone Project

This seminar provides the student with the opportunity to integrate and apply the theoretical foundations and clinical knowledge of nursing science in a comprehensive manner. In collaboration with faculty, the student uses disciplined inquiry to develop a project involving the analysis of a nursing problem, trend, or related issue.

Credit Hours: 2 (30 contact hours)
Corequisites: NURS 4790; NURS 4910. This course must be taken in the graduating semester with NURS 4910.
 

NURS 5210: Health Care Informatics

This core course addresses informatics theory and practice applications.  Students explore the utilization of computer technology for documentation, communication, health challenge research, discharge planning, emancipatory client education, professional development, networking, and health team collaboration.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: Admission to the MSN program

NURS 5215: Legal/Ethical Issues in Advanced Nursing Practice

This core course explores the most pressing legal/ethical issues and concerns related to the delivery of nursing education and the administration of health care.  This course is structured to present theories of ethical practice, as well as issues of the law related to nursing education and health care administration.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: Admission to the MSN program

NURS 5220: Transcultural and Social Perspectives

This core course broadens understanding of diversities in race, cultures, communities, lifestyles, gender, and age groups.  Students have an opportunity to explore changing demographics, major health needs, health promotion and disease prevention, and mental health issues as they apply to the diversity of humankind.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: Admission to the MSN program

NURS 5315 - Applied Statistics

This core course explores basic descriptive and inferential  statistics in nursing and educational research, as well as correlation and regression; normal, t, chi-square, and F distributions; analysis of variance; hypothesis testing and interval estimation.  Use of computer software applications in statistics is introduced.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 2315 or equivalent

NURS 5330 - Health Policy

This core course examines major dimensions of health policy.  A framework is presented for analyzing contemporary health policy issues and processes in the U.S. and globally.  The course examines the roles of interest groups in shaping policy change and analyzes the development of evidence-based approaches to health policy.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the MSN program

NURS 5340 - Research for Advanced Nursing Practice

This core course explores research methodologies commonly used in advanced nursing practice.  Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of published research, development of research proposals and practice in scholarly writing.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: NURS 5315

NURS 5380: Transition to Advanced Nursing Practice

This core course examines various theoretical and conceptual frameworks basic to advanced nursing practice.  The course explores ways of developing knowledge through such processes as scientific inquiry, critical thinking, logic, and intuition.   The relationship of critical thinking and theory development to evidence-based practice, research, and education is emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the MSN program

 
NURS 6310: Curriculum and Evaluation

This course introduces students to the art and science of curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation in nursing education.  A variety of theories, models, and concepts in nursing, education, and related disciplines that underline these processes are explored.  The roles and responsibilities of the nurse educator are also examined.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses.

NURS 6315: Organizational Behavior

This course examines the interaction between organizations and their environments from a sociological perspective.  Emphasis is on organizational decision making, leadership systems, leadership styles, change theories, and organizational dynamics.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses.

NURS 6320: The Nurse as Educator

This course is an exploration of the interplay of the university faculty member role, educational and professional leadership, and external forces that impact nursing education programs.  Students will complete a comprehensive investigation of the academic nursing role in higher education relative to program administration, student issues, program requirements, and faculty expectations.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses.

NURS 6325: Management of Health Personnel

This course provides an opportunity to critically analyze issues related to the management of resources required to deliver quality health care.  Through discussion and evaluation of research and theory, insight into the relationship between resource management and organizational performance will occur.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses.

NURS 6330: Instructional Design

This course provides an overview of several models for instructional design and examines the processes involved in designing effective instructional interventions including both behavioral and cognitive strategies for instructional design and the theory and research background related to each approach.  Students will apply these strategies in assessment of needs, analysis, design, development, management, and evaluation of an instructional system or program.  The course requires the development of an instructional unit for a teaching application.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses, NURS 6310, NURS 6320, NURS 6710

NURS 6335: Financial Management in Health Care

This course probes the issues that affect financial management of health care institutions in an era of aggressive reform.  Concepts related to budget analysis, risk and return, asset valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure, business financial planning, and working capital management are discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses, NURS 6315, NURS 6325, NURS 6715

NURS 6710: Education Practicum I

This course provides the student an opportunity to examine and evaluate learning experiences in nursing education.  Emphasis is on the application of teaching-learning and evaluation strategies for different populations in the nursing classroom.  Students will work closely with nursing faculty preceptors to develop and implement instructional content for prelicensure nursing students.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses
Corequisites: NURS 6310, NURS 6320

NURS 6715: Administration Practicum I

This course focuses on the analysis and application of principles of leadership in health care environments.  The student will have an opportunity to observe and participate with an administrative preceptor.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses.
Corequisites: NURS 6315, NURS 6325

NURS 6720: Education Practicum II

This course builds upon the concepts, theories, and strategies utilized in NURS 6710.  Students will work closely with a nursing educator preceptor to manage a group of prelicensure nursing students during their clinical rotation.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses, NURS 6710
Corequisite: NURS 6330

NURS 6725: Administration Practicum II

This course builds upon the concepts, theories, and strategies utilized in NURS 6715.  Students will work closely with a nurse executive to develop skill in leading a health care team.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of all 5000 level nursing courses, NURS 6715
Corequisite: NURS 6335

NURS 6730: Capstone Project

The course builds upon the knowledge and skills developed throughout the MSN curriculum.  A research project is developed under the supervision of faculty.  Emphasis is placed on a project that has practical application.  This course must be completed during the semester prior to graduation.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Must be taken in the graduating semester

OLOL 4999 - Sustained Enrollment

This course is for students who have completed all degree requirements and are scheduled to graduate. This course awards no credit and is not a requirement of any degree program at OLOLC.

Prerequisite: Completion of degree requirements

PHAS 5715 - Research Methods

This course covers research and evaluation methods and techniques commonly used in healthcare, including problem selection, literature review, instrumentation, methodology, statistical analyses, and the writing of research reports and articles. It includes the interpretation of published research and intensive practice of scientific writing techniques, application of statistical analyses, and application of research methodologies.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: Successful completion of third semester Physician Assistant program requirements

PHAS 5726 - PA History and Professional Issues

This course introduces the new PA student to the history of the PA profession, the elements of PA practice, and the credentials necessary for practice. In addition, the course exposes students to contemporary issues in the organization and delivery of health care services and discusses interaction with other future health care professionals. A variety of professional and legal issues pertinent to PA practice are discussed and debated.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Admission to Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5727 - Patient Assessment: Interviewing and Physical Examination

This course focuses on the medical interview and physical exam as clinical skills. The various components of the medical history are presented along with techniques for effective medical interviewing. Students apply these skills while obtaining histories from selected patients. Guidance is provided with respect to communicating with patients of all cultural backgrounds, ages and personalities. The tools, techniques, procedures, and skills of the diagnostic physical examination are presented in a systems approach as they relate to the systematic performance and documentation of complete and problem focused physical examinations.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5728 - Clinical Medicine Skills

Basic surgical principles and techniques are presented, including asepsis fundamentals, O.R. procedure and conduct, wound care and healing, closure, debridement and dressings. Laboratory sessions include minor surgical techniques and other procedures necessary for diagnosis and treatment. Surgical instruments, anesthesia, pre- and postoperative care, common surgical procedures and surgical complications are discussed. ACLS training is included in this course. This course also focuses on how to record pre and post-operative notes and the surgical medical record.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites:   Successful completion of third semester Physician Assistant program requirements

PHAS 5731 - Pharmacotherapeutics I

This is the first course in a two course in-depth study of hormonal agents, autonomic drugs, anesthetics, analgesics, anti-infective agents, antibiotics, hypnotics, cardiac drugs, vitamins, renal drugs, and topical agents, as well as the principles of pharmacokinetics, chemotherapy, and toxicology. Both oral and intravenous modes of delivery are discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Successful completion of second semester Physician Assistant program requirements

PHAS 5732 - Pharmacotherapeutics II

This course is a continuation of PHAS 5731 Pharmacotherapeutics I. It covers the second half of the material as correlated to the Medicine and Surgery courses.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:  PHAS 5731

PHAS 5740 - Medical Anatomy  

This course is a region oriented study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on anatomical concepts and relationships relevant to the practice of medicine. A computer software program is utilized in addition to lecture material and clinical case studies are included.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Admission to Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5742 - Medical Physiology

This is a comprehensive course covering the physiology of all major systems of the human body. Special emphasis is placed on the clinical application of this knowledge to patient management. It is designed specifically for PA students and interrelates with their courses in clinical medicine.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Admission to Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5745 -   Radiology

 This course teaches the student how to read and interpret the various forms of diagnostic imaging.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: Successful completion of third semester Physician Assistant program requirements

PHAS 5750 - Foundations of Clinical Medicine and Surgery I

The essentials of human pathophysiology and their relationship to clinical signs and symptoms elicited in the medical history and physical examination are presented. The etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic aspects of common diseases within ophthalmology, otolaryngology, genetics, dermatology and infectious disease are discussed and correlated. General approaches to medical management of selected problems are also presented. Although an organ-systems approach is utilized, the systems are integrated for discussion of multi-system pathology.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first semester Physician Assistant program requirements

PHAS 5751 - Foundations of Clinical Medicine and Surgery II

The essentials of human pathophysiology and their relationship to clinical signs and symptoms elicited in the medical history and physical examination are presented. The etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic aspects of common diseases within nephrology, urology, neurology/neuroscience and endocrinology are discussed and correlated. General approaches to medical management of selected problems are also presented. Although an organ-systems approach is utilized, the systems are integrated for discussion of multi-system pathology.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester Physician Assistant program requirements

PHAS 5752 - Foundations of Clinical Medicine and Surgery III

 The essentials of human pathophysiology and their relationship to clinical signs and symptoms elicited in the medical history and physical examination are presented. The etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic aspects of common diseases within orthopedics, rheumatology, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology are discussed and correlated. General approaches to medical management of selected problems are also presented. Although an organ-systems approach is utilized, the systems are integrated for discussion of multi-system pathology.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites:  Successful completion of second semester Physician Assistant program requirements

PHAS 5753 - Foundations of Clinical Medicine and Surgery IV

The essentials of human pathophysiology and their relationship to clinical signs and symptoms elicited in the medical history and physical examination are presented. The etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic aspects of common diseases within hematology, oncology, and gastro-intestinal system are discussed and correlated. General approaches to medical management of selected problems are also presented. Although an organ-systems approach is utilized, the systems are integrated for discussion of multi-system pathology.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: Successful completion of second semester Physician Assistant program requirements

PHAS 5754- Foundations of Clinical Medicine and Surgery V

The essentials of human pathophysiology and their relationship to clinical signs and symptoms elicited in the medical history and physical examination are presented. The etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic aspects of common diseases within cardiology, pulmonology and emergency medicine are discussed and correlated. General approaches to medical management of selected problems are also presented. Although an organ-systems approach is utilized, the systems are integrated for discussion of multi-system pathology.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Successful completion of second semester Physician Assistant program requirements 

PHAS 5755 - Clinical Laboratory Medicine

Presented in multiple formats including traditional lectures, labs, and case studies, this course introduces the student to the importance of clinical laboratory medicine in the delivery of health care. In addition to basic theory, the course focuses on the selection, collection and handling of samples for testing. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and clinical application of common diagnostic laboratory studies. Topic areas include blood banking, chemistry, coagulation, hematology, immunology, microbiology, and urinalysis.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Successful completion of second semester Physician Assistant program requirements 

PHAS 5760 - PA Ethics and Medical Law

Medical ethics are discussed and a variety of ethical cases are debated by students after completing on line research into the issues involved. Lectures in medical law and the legal obligations of health professionals are presented.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5762 – Psychosocial Dynamics in Healthcare

This course introduces the student to the psychological, social and family context of health, illness and health care. A major premise of this course is that to adequately meet the needs of the patient, the PA must consider not only disease factors, but psychosocial factors, which affect the disease and are affected by it as well. Topics include personality development from infancy through old age, the family's role in health care, sex and sexuality, abuse of substances, and death and dying

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester Physician Assistant program requirements 

PHAS 5771 - General Clinical Medicine I

Students actively participate in all aspects of direct patient care in inpatient and/or outpatient adult medicine. This fundamental clinical experience places emphasis on patient evaluation and assessment, oral and written case presentations, understanding the complexities and interrelationships of disease processes and diagnostic and therapeutic collaboration. (Four weeks )

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5772 - General Clinical Medicine II

Students actively participate in all aspects of direct patient care in inpatient and/or outpatient adult medicine. This fundamental clinical experience places emphasis on patient evaluation and assessment, oral and written case presentations, understanding the complexities and interrelationships of disease processes and diagnostic and therapeutic collaboration.  (Four weeks)
 
Credit Hours:  4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5773 - General Clinical Medicine III

Students actively participate in all aspects of direct patient care in inpatient and/or outpatient adult medicine. This fundamental clinical experience places emphasis on patient evaluation and assessment, oral and written case presentations, understanding the complexities and interrelationships of disease processes and diagnostic and therapeutic collaboration. (Four weeks)
 
Credit Hours:  4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5774 - General Clinical Medicine IV

Students actively participate in all aspects of direct patient care in inpatient and/or outpatient adult medicine. This fundamental clinical experience places emphasis on patient evaluation and assessment, oral and written case presentations, understanding the complexities and interrelationships of disease processes and diagnostic and therapeutic collaboration. (Four weeks)
 
Credit Hours:  4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5775 - General Clinical Medicine V

Students actively participate in all aspects of direct patient care in inpatient and/or outpatient adult medicine. This fundamental clinical experience places emphasis on patient evaluation and assessment, oral and written case presentations, understanding the complexities and interrelationships of disease processes and diagnostic and therapeutic collaboration. (Four weeks)
 
Credit Hours:  4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5776 - General Surgery

This clinical experience provides exposure to concepts and principles that characterize the practice of general surgery. Students participate in the pre-operative, operative and post-operative care of patients admitted to a surgical service in inpatient, and outpatient settings. (Four weeks)

Credit Hours:  4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5777 - Musculoskeletal Medicine

Students actively participate in all aspects of direct patient care in inpatient and/or outpatient adult musculoskeletal medicine. This fundamental clinical experience places emphasis on patient evaluation and assessment, oral and written case presentations, understanding the complexities and interrelationships of disease processes and diagnostic and therapeutic collaboration. (Four weeks)
 
Credit Hours:  4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5778 - Pediatrics

Practical experience in the recognition and management of pediatric problems is provided, including assessment of the newborn, well baby care, preventive pediatrics, developmental assessment, infectious disease, adolescent medicine and parent counseling. (Four weeks)

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5779- Emergency Medicine

This clinical experience includes the management of acute medical and surgical problems with an emphasis on the importance of precise diagnosis as well as the principles of emergency therapy. (Four weeks)

Credit Hours:  4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5780 - Focused Topics in Medicine

Students actively participate in all aspects of direct patient care in inpatient and/or outpatient women’s health, long term care and phychiatry. This fundamental clinical experience places emphasis on patient evaluation and assessment, oral and written case presentations, understanding the complexities and interrelationships of disease processes and diagnostic and therapeutic collaboration. (Four weeks)
 
Credit Hours:  4
Prerequisite: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5910 – Master’s Project Seminar

In this course, students critically research one area of the medical literature based on a clinical area of interest. They develop a review article appropriate for publication in a peer reviewed journal.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHAS 5925 - PA Seminar

This multifaceted course spans the clinical phase of the Program. It includes sessions on PA employment, health promotion and disease prevention, alternative medicine and clinical problem solving.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: Completion of the didactic phase of the Physician Assistant program

PHIL 2310 - Philosophy and Critical Thinking

Critical thinking is a course designed to enable the student to correctly evaluate and craft well-reasoned arguments. This course will encourage the development of critical thinking skills and abilities, fair-mindedness, intellectual humility, and intellectual integrity among other virtues. The approach will be practical yet based on philosophical tenets that have been proven through the ages as essential components for the development of core values and virtues in the thinking human being.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

PHIL 2315 - Current Moral Problems

This course presents a serious focus on classical ethical theories as underpinning for understanding current moral issues. Accordingly, we will deal with values, with the good and bad, with right and wrong, insofar as they apply to urgent issues in the contemporary world milieu. The issues that we will grapple with are: world poverty, the environment, euthanasia, abortion, sex, personal relationships, equality and discrimination, criminal rights, business ethics, crime and punishment, dirty politics, and war and peace. How are we to live our lives as moral human beings in dealing with these issues?

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

PHIL 2320 - Ethical Issues in Health Care

This course is about applied ethics in various professional health care fields. Ethics is that branch of Philosophy that seeks to determine how human actions may be judged right or wrong. It is concerned with how a human life ought to be lived. The goal of this course is to study the obligations of Health Care Professionals to themselves, towards their patients, and towards society as a whole. This will be accomplished by studying the foundational principles of Health Care Ethics and dealing with ethical problems inherent in Health Care.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

PHSC 1310 - Physical Science

This course investigates the physical science of measurement, vectors, kinematics, Newton's law of motion, wave motion, temperature, electric fields and currents and optics. Fundamentals of classical physical science are discussed. Considerable emphasis is placed on radiation and radiobiology.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisite: MATH 1315

PHYS 1310 - General Physics I

Algebra-based physics course consisting of mechanics, thermodynamics, and wave properties. This course includes laboratory investigations.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 1315

PHYS 1311 - General Physics II

Algebra-based physics course consisting of electricity, magnetism, light, and nuclear physics. This course includes laboratory investigations.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: PHYS 1310
 
PSYC 1310 - Introductory Psychology

This course involves a survey of the major fields of psychology including the biopsychological, learning theory, cognitive, humanistic, and psychoanalytic perspectives. Topics to be discussed will include the biological basis of behavior, states of consciousness, learning theory, memory, intelligence, personality, and stress.

Credit Hours: 3

PSYC 2330 - Psychology Across the Life Span

This course provides a study of the development of behavior and psychological processes throughout the prenatal period, infancy, childhood, adolescence, maturity and old age with emphasis on development. Classroom activities will include lecture, group discussions, demonstrations, individual projects, video presentations, library assignments and research projects.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310, PSYC 1310

PSYC 2340 - Social Psychology

In this course, students will study how people interact with each other and how they think about and respond to social situations. Included are such topics as social cognition (person perception, self perception, attitudes), social influence (conformity, persuasion, cultural sources of attitudes), and social relations (aggression, altruism, prejudice).

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310, PSYC 1310

PSYC 3310 - Child Psychology

This course will discuss the physical, psychological, social, intellectual, and moral development of an individual from birth to adolescence. It will explore the relationship between research and childrearing practices. There will also be discussion of the commonalities and diversities in today's multicultural society and its effect on children.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2330

PSYC 3315 - Abnormal Psychology

This course is designed to increase the student's understanding about the dynamics of abnormal disorders or psychological origin. An overview of the historical perspectives of abnormal; psychology will be presented. Students will be provided with an opportunity to explore and discuss etiologies, symptomatologies, and treatments of psychological disorders.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2330

PSYC 3320 - Psychology of Adolescence

This course focuses on the study of the period from puberty to adulthood with an exploration of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development. Focus will be on theories, empirical findings, and concerns of adolescence. Topics will include: 1) parent-peer relationships; 2) education; 3) identity formation; 4) sexuality; drugs; and mental health issues.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2330

PSYC 3325 - The Psychology of Aging

The focus of this course will be on successful aging. There will be a discussion of the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial competencies of individuals in late adulthood. Classroom activities will include demonstrations of assessment skills in various performance areas as well as in-depth discussion of national research on successful aging.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2330

PSYC 3335 - Personality

This course introduces a variety of theoretical approaches to the understanding of personality. It will include psychodynamic, behavioral, social learning, trait, humanistic, cognitive and biological perspectives. Consideration is both biological and environmental determinants of personality.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310, PSYC 1310, and 3 hrs of PSYC at the 2000 level

PSYC 3340 - Group Dynamics

This course is a study of what happens when people form groups, both from the perspective of individuals as members of groups and of the group itself as an entity. Students will learn what happens to people when they join groups, how groups function, what goes on within groups, and how groups interact with other groups. We will explore the theory and research on group dynamics and apply this knowledge to gain a better understanding of ourselves and the groups we belong to.  Also, through in-class group activities, we will experience various phenomena of group dynamics.  Finally, students will conduct an observational study of group behavior.

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites:  Completion of at least one 2000 level psychology course

PSYC 4310 - Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

In this course, students will gain comprehensive knowledge of and experience practicing the research methodologies and statistical procedures used in behavioral research. Students will learn how to appropriately apply the use of descriptive and inferential statistics to conduct methodologically sound research. Students will learn, in depth, how to professionally conduct archival, self-report, observational, survey, and experimental research; test for reliability and validity; and use advanced procedures in descriptive and inferential statistics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL1310; MATH 1315, MATH 2315; 6 Credit Hours of Psychology

PSYC 4315 - Neuropsychopharmacology

The content of this course is derived from: 1) neuroanatomy; 2) neurophysiology; 3) pathophysiology; 4) biochemistry; 5) pharmacology; and the 6) behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on the neurobiological processes underlying psychopathology and the pharmacological interventions indicated for treatment and management of mental illness.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310, MATH 1315; 12 credit hours of PSYC; 12 Credit Hours of ARTS, HUMN and PHIL; 12 Hours of BIOL

PSYC 4630 - Senior Project in Psychology

This course is a senior level independent study course where students will gain the experience of conducting scientific research in psychology under the close supervision of the instructor. In the first four weeks of the course, students do a literature search on a research topic and prepare a research proposal. In the second part of the course, students will conduct the research after receiving IRB approval (if necessary), analyze data using SPSS, write up the completed research paper in APA style, and present their research at a student, regional, or national conference. Students who complete this course should be ready to begin graduate studies in a psychology program.

Credit Hours:  6
Prerequisites:  ENGL 2310, completion of all 2000 and 3000 level requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies with Psychology concentration, and PSYC 4310.

PTAP 1110 - Introduction to Patient Care

This course introduces basic information regarding the health care system in general and the profession of physical therapy, in order to explore physical therapist assisting as a career choice. Emphasis is placed on the provision of physical therapy services, the history and scope of the practice of the physical therapist and the physical therapist assistant, factors influencing the delivery of service, relationships and communication with patients and other health care providers, professional behaviors and legal and ethical issues related to health care. Guest lecturers and panels will provide insight into health care from current practitioners. The student will gain an understanding of the professional responsibilities inherent in providing health care and learn basic concepts of developing provider relationships.

Credit Hours: 1

PTAP 2310 - Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology

This course is designed to provide the potential physical therapist assistant student a fundamental understanding of the musculoskeletal system as it applies to movement. Emphasis is placed on muscles and muscle groups, their origins and insertions, innervations and actions. The student has the opportunity to learn characteristics and components of normal movement as a basis for understanding abnormal movement.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: BIOL 2310
Corequisite: PTAP 2310L

PTAP 2310L - Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab

This laboratory course is designed to coincide with the Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology lecture course. Course content follows the content presented in lecture and provides the student the opportunity to apply concepts of movement to the human anatomy through lab activities incorporating palpation, movement and problem solving. Students analyze movement in individual regions of the body and demonstrate comprehension through written and practical applications.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: BIOL 2310
Corequisite: PTAP 2310

PTAP 2710 - Introduction to Physical Therapy

This course is designed to give the physical therapist assistant student fundamental understanding of the provision of health care. Emphasis is placed on provision of physical therapy services, scope of practice of the physical therapist assistant and the physical therapist, factors influencing the delivery of service, relationships and communication relative to patients and other health care providers, legal and ethical issues related to health care, and documenting in the medical record. The student participates in clinical experiences which are designed to provide an opportunity to observe and practice professional behaviors; interact with patients, families and health care providers; become familiar with medical records and the patient chart; and observe parameters of the physical therapist assistant scope of practice. Critical thinking skills are developed during class discussion, participation in clinical experiences and in small group activities.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program

PTAP 2715 - Neurophysiology of Rehabilitation

This course is designed to give the physical therapist assistant student a fundamental understanding of the nervous system and its association to movement and movement dysfunction. Neuroscience from the perspectives of anatomy and physiology is explored. The student has the opportunity to learn the relationship of the nervous system to control of normal movement and movement dysfunction. Emphasis is placed on the use of correct terminology, neuromuscular function and rehabilitation of movement dysfunction.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program 

PTAP 2718 - Human Development

This lecture course introduces the student to human development throughout the lifespan, from prenatal development to the senior adult. The student has the opportunity to learn the relationship of the areas of the developmental process. Although focused on development from neonatal through early childhood, the student will be introduced to the changes that occur in aging throughout life. Emphasis is placed on prenatal development, the developmental sequence, and developmental disabilities. The student will also discover the impact that age-related disease processes or disabilities can have on individuals and/or their families at any point along the developmental continuum.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program

PTAP 2720 - Clinical Science I

This course is designed to give the physical therapist assistant student the opportunity to learn and practice fundamental assessments, patient care skills and procedures. Students are instructed in data collection skills, treatment intervention skills, and procedures. Students then have the opportunity to perform these skills in the laboratory setting with student-to-student practice. Students must demonstrate competency in performing these skills, procedures and assessments in the laboratory setting prior to performing them in a clinical setting.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program

PTAP 2725 - Clinical Science II

This course is designed as a continuation of PTAP 2720. Lecture and laboratory experiences are combined to instruct the student in data collection and treatment procedures utilized in current physical therapy practices. Emphasis is placed on the treatment procedures involved in therapeutic massage, hydrotherapy, wound care, edema control, orthotics, transfers and assisted mobility, normal gait, prosthetics and traction within the scope of practice of the physical therapist assistant. The student will incorporate data collection techniques and interventions learned in the previous courses, with those learned in this course, to demonstrate competency in the provision of total patient treatment. Laboratory experiences will provide the opportunity to experience and to practice these procedures. Competency in performance of the procedures is determined by skill check-off and by practical demonstration in competency evaluations utilizing patient scenarios.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program

PTAP 2730 - Clinical Science III

This therapeutic exercise course combines technology, lecture and laboratory experiences to introduce the physical therapist assistant student to exercise as a treatment procedure. The student will learn about exercise from the cellular to the systemic effects. Emphasis is placed on various kinds of exercise, application of exercise technique, special areas of therapeutic exercise, and to physical therapy practice patterns. The student will practice range of motion exercise, stretching techniques, resistance, traction and aerobic exercise and pulmonary hygiene techniques, and will learn how to progress those exercises. Data collection techniques and interventions learned in previous classes will be utilized in combination with various exercise procedures in order to enhance rehabilitation and monitor subject response to the procedures. 

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program

PTAP 2735 - Clinical Science IV

This course is designed to provide a forum by which PTA students can integrate didactic and clinical experiences in the development of skills relative to the practice of physical therapy. The student will have the opportunity to prepare for entry-level employment in physical therapy, and will be introduced to issues and topics relative to the practice of physical therapy which are considered post-graduate level skill development. These include topics in specialty areas of physical therapy practice, alternative therapeutic approaches to patient care, and advanced techniques in musculoskeletal and neuromuscular dysfunction. Projects and laboratory experiences provide the opportunity for the student to gain an introductory knowledge and application base upon which clinical skills are developed.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program

PTAP 2740 - Pathophysiology

This lecture course introduces the student to injuries, diseases and conditions that affect the neuromusculoskeletal systems, and which are primary to the practice of physical therapy. A systems approach to understanding the function of the human body and the effect of pathological entities on the system are presented. Emphasis is placed on the cause and effect of the pathological condition; the signs and symptoms of the pathology; the general effect on human performance and function of the patient; and, the physical therapy management of the condition and patient. The student is provided the opportunity to identify potential medical complications that effect physical therapy interventions and the patient's safe response to the intervention.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program 

PTAP 2745 - Clinical Education I

This course is designed to provide the opportunity for the student to apply previously learned assessments, procedures and skills to direct patient care under the supervision of a licensed practitioner of physical therapy. The student will participate in one full time five - week affiliation in either an acute, rehab or out-patient setting that provides a variety of clinical experiences with a diverse patient population. Each student is assigned to a clinical instructor, who is primarily responsible for planning clinical experiences reflective of course learning outcomes and current practice, evaluation of student performance and providing immediate feedback to facilitate learning. The student will have the opportunity to master skills learned in the laboratory setting and integrate behaviors reflective of professional competency within the scope of practice of the physical therapist assistant.  

Note: This course has a service learning component

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program 

PTAP 2750 - Clinical Education II

This clinical education course involves assignment of the student to two different full time affiliations totaling ten weeks. The student will have the opportunity to apply all treatment procedures, assessments and patient care skills necessary for entry level competency for the practice of physical therapist assisting. The longer assignments allow the student to follow patients through the course of therapy in order to observe changes in patient function in response to treatment. The student will have the opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills to master critical thinking skills, analyze patient response to treatments, participate as a member of the health care team, participate in patient, family and staff teaching activities, and model professional behaviors. Upon completion of this course, the student will have demonstrated all critical skills necessary for entry-level competency of a physical therapist assistant.

Credit Hours: 10
Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assisting program

RADT 1710 - Introduction to Radiography

An introduction to the principles and practices of radiology; historical and professional evolution, status of the health care delivery system, medicolegal and ethical considerations, medical communications, the imaging process and equipment, radiographic preparation and examinations, basic principles of radiation safety, and management techniques of the patient during radiologic procedures.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology program
Corequisites: ACSM 1110, BIOL 2310, MATH 1315, RADT 1720, RADT 1740, RADT 1740L

RADT 1715 - Radiographic Procedures II

This course provides a study of radiographic procedures with related positioning and anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the vertebral column, abdomen, mobile, surgical, and trauma radiography, fluoroscopic and contrast media examinations. Cranial topography and morphology, radiography of the cranial, facial, nasal, zygomatic arches, paranasal sinuses, orbits, optic foramen, mandible and temeromandibular joints with image analysis and interpretation is also included. Students are provided with laboratory opportunities to develop practical skills.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:RADT 1710, RADT 1720, RADT 1740, RADT 1740L
Corequisites: BIOL 2311, WRIT 1310, RADT 1725, RADT 1741

RADT 1720 - Image Production I

A study of radiation concepts with related practical application; x-ray properties, basic x-ray equipment, principles of x-ray production, x-ray interactions, prime factors of exposure, exposure calculations, image receptors and accessory devices, basic digital imaging process, components of image quality, technique charts, characteristics of image receptor systems, grids, filtration, beam restriction, technique manipulation, exposure control systems, and technical factors that influence and control image production and quality. Lab opportunities will allow students to produce and analyze images by varying technical parameters.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the RADT associate degree program
Corequisites: ACSM 1110,
BIOL 2310, MATH 1315, RADT 1710, RADT 1740, RADT 1740L

RADT 1725 - Image Production II

This course is a continuation of RADT 1720. The technical factors and variables that affect the photographic and geometric quality of an image are analyzed. The course examines the methods of conventional and digital imaging technology processes with related practical application; design and construction requirements for acquisition, processing and displaying images; characteristics of conventional and digital image receptors and detectors including handling and storage, latent image formation; automatic processor equipment, system components, cycles, chemistry, processor monitoring and preventative maintenance; quality assurance/control testing programs, silver recovery, sensitometry, image artifacts, evaluation of image quality, exposure selection and conversions. Lab opportunities will allow students to produce and analyze images by varying technical parameters.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: RADT 1710, RADT 1720, RADT 1740, RADT 1740L
Corequisites: BIOL 2311, WRIT 1310, RADT 1715, RADT 1741

RADT 1730 - Radiation Protection & Radiobiology

A study of radiation protection safety practices and radiobiology; Emphasis on units of measurement, radiation quantities and units, detection devices, cellular components, radiation effects, dose limits and calculations, protective measures, equipment and shielding design; federal and state regulations governing radiation protection.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: LEVEL I Semesters I and II Radiologic Technology courses. 
Corequisites: PHSC 1310, RADT 17385, RADT 1742

RADT 1735 – Radiography Procedures III

An examination of radiographic anatomy and patient care methods with related imaging equipment. Emphasis on venipuncture, demonstration of the proper procedure for acquisition of vital signs along with recognition of life threatening ECG tracing,
pediatric and trauma radiography, foreign body localization, and basic principles of computed tomography.  Students are provided with laboratory opportunities to develop practical skills
.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites:  1st and 2nd Semester Level 1 Radiologic Technology courses

RADT 1740 - Radiographic Practicum and Procedures I

Supervised clinical experiences designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the actual practice of radiology. This course includes theoretical and practical components. Instruction in positioning and basic imaging principles and considerations, terminology, anatomy and radiographic examination and evaluation of the upper extremity, shoulder girdle, lower extremity, pelvis and upper femora, bony thorax, thoracic viscera, and geriatric imaging; emphasis on operation of equipment, performance of darkroom procedures, patient care management, communication skills, application of radiation protection precautions, and the general radiographic process. Students are provided with laboratory opportunities to develop practical skills.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology program; Current CPR-C certification.
Corequisites: ACSM 1110, BIOL 2310, MATH 1315, RADT 1710, RADT 1720

RADT 1740L - Radiographic Anatomy  and Positioning 1 Lab

Supervised laboratory experiences designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the practice of radiology. This course includes instruction in positioning and basic imaging principles and considerations, terminology, anatomy and radiographic examination and evaluation of the upper extremity, shoulder girdle, lower extremity, pelvis and upper femora, bony thorax and thoracic viscera and geriatric imaging; emphasis on operation of equipment, image production, patient care management, communication skills, application of radiation protection precautions, basic skills in oxygen administration, and the general radiographic process.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology program
Corequisites: ACSM 1110, BIOL 2310, MATH 1315, RADT 1720, RADT 1740, RADT 1710

RADT 1741 - Radiographic Practicum II

This course provides supervised clinical performance of basic skills with more emphasis on preparation of the patient, room, and equipment for fluoroscopic, mobile, surgical, emergency/trauma and general radiographic procedures, including image evaluation. There is continued development and application of clinical competencies.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: RADT 1710, RADT 1720, RADT 1740, RADT 1740L
Corequisites: BIOL 2311, WRIT 1310, RADT 1715, RADT 1725

RADT 1742 - Radiographic Practicum III

This course focuses on continued development and application of clinical competencies with emphasis on precautions in patient care and performance of general radiographic procedures, emergency/trauma, mobile, surgical, fluoroscopic and contrast media procedures, and corresponding image evaluation.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: LEVEL I Semester I and II Radiologic Technology courses
Corequisites: PHSC 1310, RADT 1730, RADT 1735

RADT 2715 - Specialized Imaging Technology

A study of the fundamental principles of special imaging techniques and equipment with emphasis on radiographic equipment and accessory devices, x-ray circuitry and rectification, image intensified fluoroscopy, body section radiography, macroradiography, mammographic equipment, exposure control systems and devices, digital imaging, thermography, cine, mobile equipment, duplication, evaluation of radiographic equipment; uses of the computer in the radiology department. Introduction to specialized imaging and therapeutic equipment including MRI, CT, US, PET, SPECT, radiation therapy and nuclear medicine technologies is provided.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: All LEVEL I Radiologic Technology courses.
Corequisites: PSYC 1310 , BIOL 1110, RADT 2720, RADT 2740

RADT 2720 - Advanced Radiographic Procedures

An examination of radiographic anatomy advanced positioning, and patient care methods with related imaging equipment. Emphasis on basic pharmacology, advanced contrast media examinations, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, scanograms, and advanced imaging studies of all body systems, including cross-sectional anatomy presentations. Students are provided with laboratory opportunities to develop practical skills.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: All LEVEL I Radiologic Technology courses.
Corequisites: PSYC 100, BIOL 1110, RADT 2715, RADT 2740

RADT 2725 - Radiographic Pathology

This course is a study of medical disease processes and their radiographic manifestations. Emphasis is placed on radiographic anatomy, physiology, pathology, and evaluation of radiographic quality with related exposure considerations.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: LEVEL II Semester I Radiologic Technology courses.
Corequisites: RELS 1310, WRIT 1311, RADT 2730, RADT 2741

RADT 2730 - Senior Seminar

Seminars of topics related to the practice of radiologic technology including written and oral presentations; a review of materials in preparation for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists Examination RADT 2740. Radiographic Practicum is included.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: LEVEL II Semester I Radiologic Technology courses.
Corequisites: RELS 1310, WRIT 1311, RADT 2725, RADT 2741

RADT 2740 - Radiographic Practicum IV

This course provides continued participation and application of general radiographic procedures, emergency/trauma, mobile, surgical, fluoroscopic procedures, contrast media administration and examinations, angiography, CT, patient care procedures, image evaluation, and quality control testing; introduction to MRI.

Credit Hours: 6  
Prerequisites: All LEVEL I Radiologic Technology Courses
Corequisites: BIOL 1110, PSYC 1310, RADT 2720, RADT 2715.

RADT 2741 - Radiographic Practicum V

This course focuses on advanced integration and application of all clinical skills including production of radiographs of optimal diagnostic quality. Clinical experiences are provided to enable students to manage patients and perform radiographic procedures with proficiency and using independent judgment. Clinical competencies related to patient preparation and management, room preparation, equipment operation, radiation safety practices, effective communication, performance of radiologic procedures utilizing appropriate supplies and accessory devices, image production, positioning, overall analysis of image quality and structures demonstrated. Elective rotations will be provided in radiation oncology, nuclear medicine, and ultrasound.

Credit Hours: 7
Prerequisites: LEVEL II Semester I Radiologic Technology courses
 Corequisites: RELS 1310, WRIT 1311, RADT 2725, RADT 2730

RELS 1310 - Introduction to Theology

This survey course introduces students to the basic divisions in the discipline of Theology and Religious Studies. Accordingly, it will present methods for the study of sacred scripture, the historical development of Judeo-Christian Theology, Systematic Theology, Religion and the Social Sciences, Religion and the Personality sciences, Spirituality, and the role of Liturgical Ritual, the Arts and Worship in the human expressions of Religion.

Credit Hours: 3

RELS 2310 - An Introduction to Religious Studies

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with certain issues in religious studies. Three such issues have been specifically identified for this course: 1) the philosophical foundations for a critical analysis of religion; 2) the foundations of Christianity; 3) and a cross-cultural examination of the major world religions. By selecting these three issues, it is intended that students will become sensitive to the philosophical nature and presuppositions of many religious claims, to the origin of Christianity and Christian beliefs about Jesus, and to the unique, as well as common perspectives of the major world religions.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

RELS 2315 - History of Christianity

This course is an introduction to the field of Historical Theology. Accordingly we will study the whole sweep of the origin, development, major historical events and controversies surrounding the phenomenon of Christianity not only as the most influential element that shaped Western Civilization as we know it, but also allow ourselves to fashion personal perspectives on life, justice and truth for living Christian lives more attuned to truths tested and honed through the ages.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

RELS 2320 - Introduction to the Old Testament

This is an overview study of the literary, historical, geographical and religious dimensions of the Old Testament. The approach used is intended to give a general, but complete overview of the whole Old Testament and the Intertestamental period. Students are guided to an understanding of God's hand in the lives and history of his people, which will lead to self-examination of biblical faith and learning in relation to daily life and individual purpose.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

RELS 2321 - Introduction to the New Testament

This course provides an overview of study of the literary, historical geographical and religious dimension of the New Testament.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

RELS 3310 - The Parables of Jesus

This course provides a detailed study of the cultural, societal, economic, political, and religious background against which Jesus proclaimed the Gospel through parables. The purpose of this course is to immerse students in a hearing of Jesus' parables from the perspective of 1st Century Palestine against which backdrop Jesus proclaimed the Good News of the imminent coming of the Kingdom of God. This course represents a challenge to the Christian believer to radically clarify his/her Christian belief system in the light of Jesus' original, and only authenticated ippsissimi verbum (His words itself).

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311

RELS 3315 - Religions of the World

The primary objective of this course will be to study, compare, and contrast the "great" world religions. These will include: Christianity; Islam; Hinduism; Buddhism; Sikhism; Confucianism; Taoism; and Judaism. Lesser know religions will also be studied: Bahai'ism; Jainism; Shintoism; Zoroastrianism.

This course is cross listed with ANTH 3310.

Credit Hours: 3

RELS 3320 - Religion and Film

This course will focus primarily on the portrayal of religion in film with a special emphasis on the cinematic representation and depiction of beliefs, doctrines, adherents, and symbology. The religious film as social and/or theological commentary will also be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311

RELS 3325 - Anthropology of Religion

This course will explore and analyze religion (understood as both a social institution and a cultural ideology) from a distinctively anthropological point of view. Particular emphasis will be placed on both the purely theoretical and ethnographic issues that are intrinsic to a cross-cultural examination of religion.

This course is cross listed with ANTH 3325.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311

RELS 3330 - Introduction to Christology

This course is an introduction to the study of Jesus the Christ. This course will deal with fundamental questions about Jesus in contemporary Catholic Christian Theological reflection. Accordingly, it will study the person of Jesus as revealed in the scholarly field of study known as the new quest for the historical Jesus, the proclamations on the Kingdom of God, the son of man and the Son of God saying, and Jesus' option for the disenfranchised. The course will also study the reasons the religious leaders of the people wanted him dead, and the significance of his crucifixion, death and resurrection. Finally the course will deal with the implications between belief in Jesus as the Son of God, and justice, compassion, concern for the environment, and the meaning and personal significance of having faith in Jesus as Savior and Redeemer of the world.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311; RELS 1310

RELS 3335 - The Letters of St. Paul

This course is designed to engage the student in the study of the thought and times of Paul of Tarsus.  Paul, the first Christian writer and theologian, has left an indelible stamp on Christianity and the Western World.  The course will look at the world in which he lived and the communities to which he wrote.  The course will examine the logic and rhetoric of Paul’s letters in order to discover the issues facing early Christianity, and Paul’s religious experience and theological insights.  The course will also ask how Paul is to be understood in today’s world; what message Paul has for contemporary Christianity.

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites:  RELS 1310 or RELS 2310

RELS 3340 -  The History and Theology of St. Francis and Franciscan Values

This course investigates the life and influence of St. Francis with the goal of helping students address five key questions: 1. Who was St. Francis?; 2. What are Franciscan values?; 3. What are the continuities and discontinuities between the Franciscan movement and other aspects of Christianity?; 4. How do the variety of biographical and hagiographical accounts of St. Francis give us insight into the needs and interests of the authors and thus inform us about how our own context might inform our understanding of St. Francis?; 5. How might Franciscan values shape the practice of healthcare?

Credit Hours: 3

RELS 4310 - Spirituality, Prayer and Healing

This course provides a theoretical and experiential study of the relationship between spirituality, methods of prayer, and their practical application in physiological and psychological healing of people who are suffering in any way.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311; RELS 1310

RELS 4315 - Christian Sacraments

This course is an experiential approach to the study of Christian sacraments. As Jesus entered fully into human experience, so this course will present the sacraments as touchstones for Divine encounters in daily living. Each of the seven sacraments their origin, Medieval synthesis, evolution, and current practices will be studied.

Successful completion of PHIL 2310 is strongly recommended.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311

RELS 4319 - Eucharistic Theology

This course represents the heart and soul, indeed the central meaning and understanding not only of Christian Worship, but the central symbolic meaning of Christian living itself.  It seeks to present the significance of the central deviations of Jesus at the last supper.  For these actions, where Jesus took, blessed, broke, and gave, represent, in summary, the ideal of the life of a Christian.  Accordingly, this course will study, in-depth, the significance of the breaking of the Bread, the pouring out of the wine and the washing of the disciples’ feet at this final meal before Jesus’ passion and death.  This course will ask:  how do these actions represent a meaning and a purpose for authentic Christian living today?

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites:  WRIT 1311; RELS 1310     

RELS 4630-Senior Project in Religious Studies

This independent study course allows students opportunity to pursue personal initiatives while exploring the relationship of theology and public service.  Students who complete this course should be ready to begin graduate studies in a Religious Studies program.  Under close faculty supervision, the student designs and completes a project that must include a service experience component, theologically based analysis, and a reflection/response essay suitable as a student presentation at a professional conference or for publication in a journal accepting undergraduate writing within the religious studies/theology disciplines.

Credit Hours:  6
Prerequisites:  ENGL 2310, completion of all 2000 and 3000 level requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies with a Religious Studies concentration.

RESP 2707 - Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology

An introductory course that focuses on the pharmacologic modes of action, indications, routes of administration and excretion, side effects, hazards and drug interactions for agents used in the management of patients with cardiopulmonary disease.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Enrolled in the Respiratory Therapy program

RESP 2708 - Respiratory Therapy Fundamentals

This is a lecture course that presents the basic principles of Respiratory Therapy. Topics include principles of patient assessment, infection control, respiratory pharmacology, as well as theory and application of equipment used to diagnose and treat cardiopulmonary disease. This course prepares students to recognize indication for therapy, initiate appropriate treatment strategies, and evaluate specific clinical outcomes.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Enrolled in the Respiratory Therapy program
Corequisite: RESP 2715

RESP 2712 - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology

This lecture series addresses the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. The course is designed to demonstrate the application of cardiopulmonary physiological principles in practice of medicine. Discussions focus on the regulation and maintenance of cardiopulmonary function under normal conditions. The course also provides an introduction to the integrative control of the cardiopulmonary function.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Enrolled in the Respiratory Therapy program

RESP 2715 - Clinical Applications and Procedures I

Introductory course designed to provide pre-clinical laboratory instruction and preceptor-supervised clinical experiences in respiratory care procedures. Emphasis is placed on routine patient care, including such modalities as patient assessment; medical gas therapy; application of aerosol and humidity devices; artificial airway care; and bronchial hygiene therapies.

Credit Hours: 7
Prerequisite: Enrolled in the Respiratory Therapy program
Corequisite: RESP 2708

RESP 2720 - Critical Care Concepts I

This lecture series introduces students to the clinical application of respiratory care in critically ill patients. It incorporates the theories and protocols learned in Respiratory Therapy Fundamentals and allows the student to develop critical care skills, which emphasize ventilatory support modalities, hemodynamic monitoring, metabolic monitoring and patient management techniques.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: RESP 2708, RESP 2712

RESP 2722 - Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology

This course provides a review of the most common diseases that affect the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. It includes discussions on clinical diagnostic techniques and treatment approaches commonly used in the management of patients with cardiopulmonary disease.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: RESP 2708, RESP 2712

RESP 2723 - Clinical Applications and Procedures II

This course introduces the respiratory therapy student to essential concepts related to critical care medicine through  laboratory and clinical instruction. Emphasis is placed on monitoring techniques, patient weaning and ventilatory support systems.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: RESP 2715

 RESP 2730 - Critical Care Concepts II

This course is a continuation of Critical Care Concepts I with further emphasis on adult critical care ventilatory support modalities. Coursework covers intermediate and advanced pulmonary care strategies. It encompasses patient management through a problem-based learning format. It also incorporates new advances in critical care procedures and a broadened approach to patient care beyond primary pulmonary diseases.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: RESP 2720

RESP 2733 - Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Long Term Care

This course is designed to introduce students to the care of chronically ill patients. Discussions will focus on the delivery of respiratory care services for hospital-based cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programs, extended care facilities, and home care.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of second semester RESP requirements

RESP 2736 - Pulmonary Diagnostic Testing

This course covers basic instrumentation and diagnostic techniques employed in the assessment of pulmonary functions. It includes interpretive analysis of test results as related to disease states and other abnormal lung conditions and provides information regarding the appropriate strategy for proper patient testing. Students are expected to apply their understanding of pulmonary physiology to the selection of appropriate testing techniques and equipment.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of third semester RESP requirements

RESP 2737 - Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care

This lecture series encompasses the therapeutic approach to treatment of neonates and pediatric patients. This course addresses the unique characteristics of both the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems for patients from birth to age twelve. Students will discusses the parameters of disease states specific to this age group, including diagnostic and management differences. Students will learn the physiological changes during gestation in relation to pulmonary management at premature birth and into recovery, as well as acute resuscitation protocols. Mechanical ventilation modalities traditional to adult care are applied to this age group, and new modalities are discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: RESP 2708, RESP 2712, RESP 2720

RESP 2738 - Clinical Applications and Procedures III

This course engages the respiratory therapy student in laboratory and clinical instruction in advanced respiratory care procedures. Emphasis is placed on cardiopulmonary strategies for adult and neonatal patients. Students will participate in the care of patients in critical care areas undergoing mechanical ventilation and in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: RESP 2721

RESP 2740 – Critical Care Concepts III

This course is a continuation of Critical Concepts II with furthered emphasis on adult critical care ventilatory support modalities. Coursework covers advanced cardio-pulmonary care strategies. It encompasses patient management through a problem-based learning format. It also incorporates new advances in critical care procedures and a broadened approach to patient care beyond primary pulmonary disease.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: RESP 2730, 2741

RESP 2741 – Clinical Applications Procedures IV

Students are provided clinical instruction in advanced respiratory care procedures. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic strategies used in adult and neonatal critical care, and cardiovascular therapeutic procedures and interventions.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: RESP 2715, 2721,
Corequisite: RESP 2742

RESP 2742 – Critical Care Seminar

This course is a review of respiratory therapy case studies and preparation for Respiratory Care Entry Level Examination, Written Registry Examination, and the Clinical Simulation Examination.

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: RESP 2730
Corequisites: RESP 2740, 2741

RESP 2743 - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Advanced Life Support

This course is designed to review the most current American Heart Association (AHA) standards for basic life support and advanced cardiac life support. Special emphasis is devoted to the recording and interpretation of electrocardiograms, pharmacologic interventions used in the treatment of cardiac emergencies, and airway management techniques used during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: Completion of third semester RESP requirements

SOCI 1310 - Introductory Sociology

This course is designed to provide an introductory review of sociology and the "sociological perspective," which can be thought of as one of many perspectives people might take in exploring and understanding human-beings. The primary goal of the course is to stimulate thinking and to apply the "sociological perspective" to relevant issues and concerns facing us as individuals as well as future health care practitioners.

Credit Hours: 3

SOCI 2310 - Marriage and the Family

This course will explore sociological perspectives on marriage and the family with emphasis on issues facing contemporary American families. Topics include: family forms, marriage, communication, domestic violence, division of labor in the family, work and family relations, child rearing, divorce and remarriage.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310; SOCI 1310

SOCI 2320-Social Problems

This course explores the relationship of social problems to social structure at the global level, with specific emphasis on poverty, hunger, exploitation, violence, and environmental degradation.  We will build a foundation for understanding how these problems arise, apply sociological concepts to their analysis, and then explore why solutions to such problems may involve structural changes which, in turn, may create new problems.

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites:  WRIT 1311; SOCI 1310

SOCI 3310 - Sociology of Deviance and Crime

Deviance and crime are important topics in contemporary sociology. This course will examine deviance, deviant behavior, and social control with an emphasis on problems facing contemporary American society. The first part of the course explores how we define deviance and the theories used to explain it. Part two will focus on types of deviance including crime, mental illness, and juvenile delinquency. Part three examines the approaches to social control (incarceration, decarceration, rehabilitation) and the problems associated with it.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:  ENGL1311; SOCI 1310

SOCI 3315 - Dying and Death

This course explores the social, psychological, and cultural aspects of dying and death in our society. Emphasis is placed on our role as professionals and health care providers, with the intent to educate and develop personal insight and skills necessary to assist patients, families and colleagues with the various aspects of dying and death. The course utilizes both didactic and experiential teaching methods to establish a better understanding and ability to cope with this life process, both as individuals and as professionals.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311; SOCI 1310

SOCI 3320 - Medical Sociology

Course is designed to understand the relationship between sociology and medicine. Methods will be described and discussed in which sociological concepts and perspectives can be used to increase our knowledge of health and illness. The social structure of the health care system will be elaborated. The relationships between sociological, cultural factors, and health, disease, etc. will be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311; SOCI 1310

SOCI 3330-Research Methods

This course is an introduction to research methods in the social sciences, including both qualitative and quantitative methodological approaches.  In it, students will learn the basic principles, language, logic and procedures of social research design, data collection, rudimentary analysis and report writing.  This course will prepare students to move further into the conduct of competent social science research, into the role of an informed consumer and critic of social research, or both.

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites:  WRIT 1311; SOCI 1310; MATH 1315; one 2000 or 3000 level SOCI course

SOCI 4310 - Sociology of Health and Medicine

This course examines sociological perspectives on health and illness as well as social problems in the context of contemporary health care in the United States. Topics include: the definition of health and illness, social responses to illness, social stratification and health, and the perceived crisis in American health care and biomedical technology.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311; SOCI 1310

SOCI 4315 - Sociology of Race, Class, and Gender

The main objective of this course is to investigate the institutional arrangements and cultural patterns that underlie gender, race, and class-based inequalities in American Society. In the process, we will repeatedly return to the central question: In what ways are race, class, and gender interrelated such that they appear in the experiences and "life chances" of individuals in different social locations at different points in time?

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311; SOCI 1310

SOCI 4320 - Women in Developing Nations

Drawing on insights from women’s studies, development studies and demography as well as sociology, this course will examine the problems and prospects encountered by the women of industrializing nations in an increasingly interrelated world.  Through readings and discussions, students will examine the changing realities of women’s lives in nations undergoing the disruptions of industrialization, explore the meanings of solidarity and feminism as they are practiced in such nations, and learn the complex ways in which women’s lives are shaped by both gender expectations and structural (economic) change.

Credit Hours:  3
Prerequisites: ENGL 2320; SOCI 1310

SOCI 4630 - Senior Project in Sociology

This independent study course allows senior majors in Liberal Studies to pursue a social topic of interest to them while developing the skills used in scholarly research.  Under close faculty supervision, the student will design and complete a comprehensive research project including a review of the sociological literature on their topic, development of a research question, and research design, data gathering and data analysis.  The student will then report on the results in an appropriately referenced paper suitable for presentation at a professional conference or publication in a sociological journal. Students who complete this course should be ready to begin graduate studies in a sociology program.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites:  ENGL 2310; completion of all 2000 and 3000 level requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies with a Sociology concentration

SPAN 1310 - Elementary Spanish I

This entry-level course introduces students to the basic lexicon and structures of Spanish. Emphasis is on communicative language. This course is for students with no previous study of Spanish.

Credit Hours: 3

SPAN 1311 - Elementary Spanish II

This course is a continuation of SPAN 1310. Emphasis is on communicative language use.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SPAN 1310

SPAN 2310 - Intermediate Spanish I

This course builds upon skills introduced in elementary Spanish. Emphasis is on reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SPAN 1311

SPAN 2311 - Intermediate Spanish II

This course is a continuation of SPAN 2310. Emphasis is on reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SPAN 2310

SURT 1110 - Introduction to Surgical Technology

This course introduces basic information regarding the health care system in general and the profession of surgical technology specifically for students to explore surgical technology as a career choice. Emphasis is placed on the scope of the practice of the surgical technologist, factors influencing the delivery of service, relationships and communication with other health care providers, professional behaviors and legal and ethical issues related to health care. Guest lecturers and panels will provide insight into health care from current practitioners. The student will gain an understanding of the professional responsibilities inherent in providing health care and learn basic concepts of developing provider relationships.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequiste: SURT 1310

SURT 1310- Fundamentals of Surgical Technology

This course introduces the student to the basic principles and practices of surgical technology, which includes preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative concepts; infection control, surgical supplies, equipment, and medications; and the needs of the patient in the surgical environment. Permission from the instructor is required.  

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisites: SURT 1110, SURT 1310L

SURT 1310L - Fundamentals of Surgical Technology Skills Lab

Instruction takes place in a well-equipped skills lab (mock OR). Emphasis is on instrument identification, classification, and use; sterile technique; pre-operative case; preparation; surgical scrubbing, gowning, gloving and draping; counting procedures; and patient positioning and skin preparation. Permission from the instructor is required.

Credit Hours: 1
Corequisite: SURT 1310

SURT 1710 - Surgical Procedures I

This course introduces the surgical technology student to basic surgical procedures; related anatomy, pathology and diagnostic measures; necessary instrumentation, supplies, equipment, and medications; possible complications; patient considerations and expected outcomes; and immediate postoperative care. Specific surgical procedures include; general, gastrointestinal, obstetrics, and gynecology (OB/GYN), and pediatrics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Admission into the Surgical Technology Program
Corequisites: SURT 1720

SURT 1711 - Surgical Procedures II

This course introduces the surgical technology student to basic surgical procedures; related anatomy, pathology and diagnostic measures; necessary instrumentation, supplies, equipment, and medications; possible complications; patient considerations and expected outcomes; and immediate postoperative care. Specific surgical procedures include: peripheral vascular, genitourinary, plastics, oral, eye, ear, nose and throat.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SURT 1710
Corequisites: SURT 1720

SURT 1720 - Skills Lab I

This course provides instruction and demonstration, with return demonstration, in a well-equipped skills lab (mock operating room). Emphasis is on open and laparoscopic procedure preparation and intraoperative techniques, including establishing the sterile field around the patient, passing instruments, loading suture, medication handling and identification, specimen handling, dressing application, and postoperative routines. Students are also instructed in obtaining vital signs and urinary catheterization.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: Admission into the Surgical Technology Program
Corequisites: SURT 1710, SURT 1711

SURT 2710 - Surgical Procedures III

This course introduces the surgical technology student to the basic surgical procedures; related anatomy, pathology and diagnostic measures; necessary instrumentation, supplies, equipment, and medications; possible complications; patient considerations and expected outcomes; and immediate postoperative care. Specific surgical procedures include: cardiothoracic, orthopedic, and neurosurgery.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SURT 1710, SURT 1711
Corequisites: SURT 2720

SURT 2720 - Surgical Procedures Practicum I

The student will rotate through the surgical suites at OLOLRMC and other local acute care facilities, applying and refining the knowledge and skills learned in the 1000 level Surgical Technology courses. Additional sites may be available. All students during this course must complete clinical reports for each surgical procedure and must attend a one hour weekly post-conference, separate from the clinical hours.

Credit Hours: 7
Prerequisites: SURT 1711, SURT 1720
Corequisites: SURT 2710

SURT 2721 - Surgical Procedures Practicum II

The student will rotate through the surgical suites at OLOLRMC and other acute care and ambulatory facilities. The student will continue to apply and refine the knowledge and skills learned in all the previous Surgical Technology courses and participate in vascular, cardiothoracic, neurological, and orthopedic procedures. All students during this course must complete clinical reports for each surgical procedure and must attend a one hour weekly post-conference and CTS examination review, separate from the clinical hours.

Credit Hours: 9
Prerequisites: SURT 2710, SURT 2720

SURT 2730 - Professional Portfolio Self Study Course

The self-study program is designed only for previous graduates of Our Lady of the Lake College Surgical Technology Certificate program. This course will capture and document in a portfolio format, all of the graduate's professional, technical and work related experience since certificate completion for assessment and evaluation of abilities and aptitudes within the role of the Surgical Technologist. Periodic sessions with the Surgical Technology Faculty will be scheduled to assure focus, provide guidance and evaluate progress.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisite: Graduates of the Our Lady of the Lake College Surgical Technology Certificate program

WRIT 0310 - Introduction to College Writing

The course focuses on grammar as a communicative tool as well as sentence and paragraph structure. WRIT 0310 provides an intensive review of grammar/mechanics, introduction to writing as process, and opportunities to strengthen reading skills. Placement in ENGL 0310 is determined by ACT/SAT test scores, and in some cases, by a written placement exam. (NOT for degree credit.)

Credit Hours: 3

WRIT 1310 – College Writing I

This course is an introductory, College level writing course. The course focuses on writing as a process, effective writing style and the features of specific writing tasks. Students are encouraged to examine and appropriately revise their own reading and writing habits. Likewise, students are exposed to theories, strategies and tools that can successful assist them in the completion of real life rhetorical tasks. Placement in WRIT 1310 determined by ACT/SAT test scores.

Credit Hours: 3

WRIT 1311 – College Writing II

English Composition II builds upon the basic reading, writing, and critical thinking skills presented in WRIT 1310. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, analytical reading and strategies for presenting ideas supported by sound reasoning, convincing evidence and language appropriate to the task and audience. The course provides practical experience in analysis and library research.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: WRIT 1310

WRIT 2315 - Business Writing

This course focuses on effective written communication in professional settings. Emphasis is on planning, composing, revising, and editing a variety of texts for professional audiences.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311

WRIT 2320 - Academic Discourse

This advanced composition course prepares students to meet the rhetorical (reading/writing) demands of courses within three major academic areas: humanities, social/behavioral sciences, and natural sciences. The literary conventions, standards, tools, and practices of all three discourse "communities" are surveyed, and students focus their semester projects within their major academic discipline or area of interest. 

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311 or permission of the instructor

WRIT 2325 - Creative Writing - Poetry

This course offers students an opportunity to practice writing a literary form they may have read independently or in other courses, namely poetry. The emphasis is on the composition and critique of poetry. Reading assignments focus on both classic and contemporary examples of poetry.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310 

WRIT 2330 - Creative Writing - Fiction

This course offers students an opportunity to practice writing a literary form they may have read independently or in other courses, namely short fiction. The emphasis is on the composition and critique of short stories. Reading assignments focus on both classic and contemporary examples of the short story.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1310

WRIT 3335 - Technical Writing

This course develops skills needed to compose objective, informative proposals, reports, and presentations for specialized audiences in science, business, government, and industry. Class sessions involve lecture, discussions, group activities and writing tasks

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT 1311